Arkansas

Arkansas Department of Education Rules Governing Standards for Accreditation of Arkansas Public Schools and School Districts:

9.03.2 Grades K-4, 9.03.2.3 Social Studies: “History and culture of Arkansas (a unit at each grade level with emphasis at grade 4), the nation, and the world (including foreign language experiences), Geography, Economics, Civic education and Social sciences processes and ”

9.03.3 Grades 5-8, 9.03.3.4 Social Studies: “History and culture of Arkansas (a unit at grades 5 and 6, with emphasis at grade 5), the nation, and the world (including foreign language experiences), Geography, Economics, Civic education and Social science process ”

9.03.3.11 “A unit of Arkansas history shall be taught as a social studies subject at each elementary grade level in every public elementary school in this state with greater emphasis at the fourth (4th) and fifth (5th) grade levels, and at least one (1) full semester of Arkansas history shall be taught to all students at the 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, or 12th grade level in every public secondary school in this state.”

9.03.4 Grades 9-12, 9.03.4.7 Social Studies – 4 units: “1 unit American history with emphasis on 20th Century America, 1 unit world history, ½ unit civics and ½ unit of Arkansas history if not taught in grade 7 or 8 (Other options as approved by the Department).”

14.1 Graduation Requirements, SMART CORE for the graduating classes of 2009-2010, 2010-2011, 2011- 2012, 2012-2013: “Social Studies – three (3) units of Civics or Civics/American Government, World History and American ”
SMART CORE for the graduating class of 2013-2014: “Social Studies – three (3) units [one (1) unit of world history, one (1) unit of U.S. history, one half (1/2) unit of civics].” 

Arkansas Social Studies Standards

 

Social Studies Curriculum Framework, Grades K-8:

One of the strands in the K-8 Social Studies Curriculum Framework is civics, under which are two standards: “Government: Students shall develop an understanding of the forms and roles of government,” and “Citizenship: Students shall develop an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of citizens.”

Civics for One Semester, Social Studies Curriculum Framework, Grades 9-12: 

“Civics for One Semester provides a study of the structure and functions of the United States government, the government of Arkansas, and political institutions. Civics for One Semester also examines constitutional principles, the concepts of rights and responsibilities, the role of political parties and interest groups, and the importance of civic participation in the democratic process. This course stresses application, problem-solving, higher-order thinking skills, and the use of classroom performance-based/open-ended assessments with rubrics. Civics for One semester fulfills the minimum Civics requirement for Core Curriculum graduates and does not require Arkansas Department of Education approval.”

Grade K

  • C.5.K.1 Recognize national symbols that represent American democracy:
    • American flag
    • Bald Eagle
    • Statue of Liberty
    • White House
    • United States Constitution

Grade 1

  • C.5.1.1 Identify and discuss national symbols that represent American democracy:
    • American flag
    • Bald Eagle
    • Statue of Liberty
    • White House
    • United States Constitution

Grade 2

  • C.5.2.1 Understand the significance of national symbols (e.g., National Anthem, Liberty Bell, Pledge of Allegiance, American Flag, Statue of Liberty, United States Constitution).

Grade 3

  • C.4.3.3 Identify the three levels of government:
    • Local
    • State
    • Federal
  • C.4.3.4 Identify the fundamental ideals of democracy (e.g., human rights, justice, common good, equal opportunity).
  • C.5.3.1 Examine the significance of national symbols and the role they play in fostering effective citizenship (e.g., National Anthem, Liberty Bell, Pledge of Allegiance, American Flag, Statue of Liberty, United States Constitution).

Grade 4

  • C.4.4.1 Compare and contrast the purpose and function of government at the local, state, and federal levels.
  • C.4.4.2 Compare responsibilities of local, state, and federal government officials.
  • C.4.4.3 Identify the three levels of government:
    • Local
    • State
    • Federal
  • C.4.4.4 Describe how United States citizens apply fundamental principles of democracy (e.g., people rule themselves, power of government limited by law, people exercise their authority directly through voting and indirectly through elected officials).
  • C.5.4.1 Identify and explain the role of the Founding Fathers in writing the founding documents:
    • Benjamin Franklin
    • John Hancock
    • Thomas Jefferson
    • James Madison
    • George Washington
  • C.5.4.2 Identify and explain the purpose of the founding documents:
    • Declaration of Independence
    • Articles of Confederation
    • United States Constitution

Grade 5

  • C.4.5.1 Recognize that the Arkansas and the United States governments are composed of three branches:
    • Executive
    • Legislative
    • Judicial
  • C.4.5.2 Identify the system of checks and balances in government.
  • C.4.5.3 Identify the roles and responsibilities of the executive branch (e.g., state/governor, federal/president).
  • C.4.5.4 Identify and describe the roles of the legislative branch (e.g., general assembly/congress, state congress and federal congress, house, senate).
  • C.4.5.5 Identify and describe the roles of the judicial branch (e.g., local, state, and federal).
  • C.4.5.6 Identify the forms of government (e.g., democracy, monarchy, dictatorship, oligarchy, totalitarian).
  • C.5.5.1 Identify the founding documents that helped to establish laws for the United States (e.g., Mayflower Compact, Declaration of Independence, United States Constitution).
  • C.5.5.2 Identify the purpose of the Declaration of Independence.
  • C.5.5.3 Identify the significance of the following individuals in establishing the government of the United States:
    • John Adams
    • Benjamin Franklin o Alexander Hamilton o Thomas Jefferson
    • John Marshall
    • James Madison
    • George Washington
  • C.5.5.4 Identify the significance of the Articles of Confederation.
  • C.5.5.5 Discuss how the ineffectiveness of the Articles of Confederation led to the creation of the United States Constitution.
  • C.5.5.10 Discuss the importance of the rights of United States citizens set forth in the Bill of Rights.
  • C.5.5.13 Identify the Bill of Rights in the United States Constitution.
  • C.5.5.14 Identify the provisions of the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments.
  • C.5.5.15 Identify various organizations from U.S. history through which citizen’s rights were affected (e.g., Women’s Suffrage, NAACP, Chinese Immigration Act, Emancipation Proclamation).
  • H.6.5.11 Evaluate the contributions of political and religious leaders in colonial America (e.g., John Smith, William Bradford, Roger Williams, Anne Hutchison, John Winthrop, Thomas Hooker, William Penn).
  • H.6.5.12 Describe the impact of slavery in the Americas (e.g., indentured servants, American Indians, African Americans).
  • H.6.5.13 Explain how conflict between the English government and the English colonies led to the outbreak of the American Revolution:
    • Stamp Act
    • Sugar Act
    • Boston Tea Party
    • Intolerable  Acts
    • Boston  Massacre
  • H.6.5.14 Identify the contributions of significant people leading to the American Revolution:
    • King George III
    • George Washington o Benjamin  Franklin o Thomas Jefferson
    • Patrick Henry
    • Thomas Paine
  • H.6.5.15 Explain the political viewpoints of Patriots and Loyalists during the Revolutionary period.
  • H.6.5.17 Explain the role of the following events in the development of the United States:
    • Shay’s Rebellion
    • Constitutional Convention
    • Creation of political parties
  • H.6.5.19 Identify and describe the events and ideas leading to the Civil War (e.g., Missouri Compromise, Dred Scott v. Sanford, Lincoln/Douglas debates).
  • H.6.5.20 Discuss the reasons for the secession of southern states from the Union.

Grade 6

  • C.4.6.1 Compare and contrast the three branches of government at the state and national levels of government:
    • Executive
    • Legislative
    • Judicial
  • C.4.6.2 Discuss the system of checks and balances in government.
  • C.4.6.3 Discuss the roles and responsibilities of the executive branch (e.g., state/governor, federal/president).
  • C.4.6.4 Compare and contrast the roles of the legislative branch (e.g., general assembly/congress, state congress and federal congress, house, senate).
  • C.4.6.5 Compare and contrast the roles of the judicial branch (e.g., local, state, and federal).
  • C.4.6.6 Discuss the forms of government (e.g., democracy, monarchy, dictatorship, oligarchy, totalitarian).
  • C.5.6.1 Determine the way rights and laws of the United States were created by examining founding documents (e.g., Declaration of Independence, United States Constitution, Mayflower Compact).
  • C.5.6.2 Examine the effects of the Declaration of Independence.
  • C.5.6.3 Evaluate reasons for writing the United States Constitution.
  • C.5.6.4 Evaluate the importance of the United States Constitution as a governing document for the United States.
  • C.5.6.9 Examine ways citizens utilize the rights guaranteed in the Bill of Rights.
  • C.5.6.12 Examine the rights guaranteed to United States citizens in the Bill of Rights.
  • C.5.6.13 Compare U.S. Constitutional Amendments granting citizen’s rights.
  • C.5.6.14 Examine how citizens rights are exercised through organizations that influenced societal and governmental change.
  • H.6.6.9 Explain how the Women’s Rights movement led to the Nineteenth Amendment.
  • H.6.6.23 Explain segregation and desegregation as established by Supreme Court cases:
    • Plessy v. Ferguson
    • Brown v. Board of Education

Grade 7

  • C.4.7.1 Discuss the different ways executive, legislative, and judicial powers have been organized.
  • C.4.7.3 Compare and contrast forms of government:
    • Democracy
    • Dictatorship
    • Monarchy
    • Oligarchy
    • Theocracy
  • H.6.7.12 Investigate the motives for the writing of the Magna Carta and the resulting influence on political power in England (e.g., establishment of Parliament).

Grade 8

  • C.4.8.1 Analyze forms of government pertaining to the legislative, executive, and judicial branches:
    • Democracy
    • Dictatorship
    • Monarchy
    • Oligarchy
    • Theocracy
    • Totalitarianism
  • H.6.8.12 Investigate influences on modern society of Enlightenment thinkers including but not limited to:
    • John Locke
    • Baron de Montesquieu
    • Jean Jacques Rousseau
  • H.6.8.13 Examine the influence of Enlightenment ideas on revolutionary movements (e.g., American Revolution, French Revolution, Latin American revolutions, Revolutions of 1848).
  • H.6.8.16 Investigate 19th century social and political reform movements (e.g., abolition, education, extension of suffrage, labor movements, rise of socialism, temperance).

Civics for One Semester

  • C.1.CCC.5 Explain and apply citizenship concepts to everyday life:
    • Equality of all citizens under the law
    • Majority rule/minority rights
    • Individual freedoms
    • Individual rights versus public interest
    • Patriotism
  • C.2.CCC.2 Distinguish between rights and privileges of citizenship (e.g., voting, driving, education).
  • G.3.CCC.1 Explain the purposes of government.
  • G.3.CCC.2 Describe how governments acquire power.
  • G.3.CCC.3 Examine the role of government in protecting the rights of people (e.g., courts).
  • G.4.CCC.1 Compare and contrast the different types of governmental ideology:
    • Dictatorship
    • Direct democracy
    • Indirect democracy
  • USC.5.CCC.1 Discuss the meaning of constitution and constitutional government.
  • USC.5.CCC.2 Explain the importance of historical documents and events that influenced the structure and development of the Constitution:
    • Mayflower Compact, 1620
    • Declaration of Independence, 1776
    • Articles of Confederation, 1781
    • Constitutional Convention, 1787
  • USC.5.CCC.3 Describe the contributions of the following individuals to the United States Constitution using primary source documents:
    • John Locke
    • Jean Jacques Rousseau
    • Founding Fathers
  • USC.6.CCC.1 Describe the reason for the organization of government in the United States Constitution.
  • USC.6.CCC.2 Describe the procedures required to amend the United States Constitution.
  • USC.6.CCC.3 Compare delegated, concurrent, and reserved powers.
  • USC.7.CCC.1 Analyze fundamental rights of individuals as incorporated in the Bill of Rights.
  • USC.7.CCC.2 Identify changes occurring over time in the interpretation of the Bill of Rights.
  • USC.7.CCC.3 Examine changes in civil rights legislation (e.g., affirmative action, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Civil Rights Acts of 1964-1965, Voting Rights Act of 1964).
  • SG.8.CCC.1 Discuss the legislative branch of the government at the federal and state levels:
    • Purpose
    • Organization
    • Authority
    • Function
  • SG.8.CCC.2 Discuss the executive branch of the government at the federal and state levels:
    • Purpose
    • Organization
    • Authority
    • Function
  • SG.8.CCC.3 Discuss the judicial branch of the government at the federal and state levels:
    • Purpose
    • Organization
    • Authority
    • Function
  • SG.8.CCC.4 Describe the separation of powers in the system of checks and balances.
  • L.9.CCC.1 Examine the source, purpose, and function of laws.
  • L.9.CCC.2 Explain the need for active and ongoing change in laws.
  • L.9.CCC.3 Distinguish between criminal and civil laws.