Delaware

Delaware Title 14, Education, Free Public Schools, Chapter 41. General Regulatory Provisions:

§4101 Reading of the First Amendment of the United States Constitution. “At the commencement of the first period of study on the first day of school of each school year in all public schools of the State, the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States of America shall be read or recited by the teacher in charge of such period to the students therein assembled.”

§4103 Teaching Constitution of the United States, Constitution and government of Delaware and the free enterprise system.
“(a) In all public and private schools located within this State, there shall be given regular courses of instruction in the Constitution of the United States, Constitution and government of Delaware and the free enterprise system.
(b)The instruction in the Constitution of the United States, Constitution and government of Delaware and the free enterprise system shall begin not later than the opening of the 8th grade and shall continue in the high school courses and in courses in state colleges, universities and the educational departments of state and municipal institutions. The extent and content of such courses below the college level shall be determined by the Department of Education with the approval of the State Board of Education. In institutions of higher learning the trustees or other governing body of such institutions shall determine the extent and content of such courses.
(c) In addition to the general requirements required by subsections (a) and (b) of this section, 1 calendar day per school year may be specifically and solely devoted to the study of the United States Constitution and the Declaration of Independence in every grade consistent with state content standards starting in first grade and continuing through twelfth grade. The program of instruction for each grade shall be determined by each individual school ”

 

Delaware State Standards

 There are four standards with grade-cluster-specific expectations for each, and sample activities: “1. Students will examine the structure and purposes of governments with specific emphasis on constitutional democracy [Government]. 2. Students will understand the principles and ideals underlying the American political system [Politics]. 3. Students will understand the responsibilities, rights, and privileges of United States citizens [Citizenship]. 4. Students will develop and employ the civic skills necessary for effective, participatory citizenship [Participation].”

Grade 4

Essential Questions

  • What were Delaware and America like before contact by Europeans?
  • How can thinking like a historian help me draw credible conclusions?
  • How did Delaware and the United States develop their forms of government?
  • What does it take to be a good citizen in a democracy?

Grade 5

Essential Questions

  • How can thinking like a historian help us draw credible conclusions?
  • How can historical sources help us understand American and their experiences?
  • What does it take to be a good citizen?

Grade 6

Essential Questions

  • Why does a government have certain powers?
  • How can thinking like a historian help us draw credible conclusions?

Grade 7

Essential Questions

  • How can informed and active citizens contribute to a well-governed society?
  • How can thinking like a historian help us draw credible conclusions?
  • How are citizens protected by the government and each other?

Grade 8

US History

  • Colonization and Settlement in America (1492-1750)
  • Revolutionary America (1750-1787) – discuss Declaration of Independence, etc.
  • Early Republic (1787-1824) – Drafting and ratification of the Constitution, first congresses and presidents. Students should examine the principles of our American political system, the content of our Constitution, and their responsibilities as citizens in a democratic society.
  • Economic and Social Change (1825-1859) – pre-Civil War era, prohibition, abolition of slavery, women’s right and suffrage.
  • Civil War and Reconstruction – 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments.

Grade 11

US History

  • Civil War and Reconstruction
  • Industrialization and Urbanization
  • Progressivism
  • American Overseas Expansion
  • The Great Depression and the New Deal
  • Entry into WWII
  • Cold War and Containment
  • Expansion of Civil Liberties (1950-1970)
  • Building Contemporary America