Illinois

Illinois General Assembly Statutes:

105 ILCS 5/27-3 American patriotism and the principles of representative government – Proper use of flag – Method of voting – Pledge of Allegiance. “American patriotism and the principles of representative government, as enunciated in the American Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States of America and the Constitution of the State of Illinois, and the proper use and display of the American flag, shall be taught in all public schools and other educational institutions supported or maintained in whole or in part by public funds. No student shall receive a certificate of graduation without passing a satisfactory examination upon such subjects.”

105 ILCS 5/27-22.a.4 Required high school courses. One of the prerequisites to receiving a high school diploma is “Two years of social studies, of which at least one year must be history of the United States or a combination of history of the United States and American government.”

 

Illinois Social Studies Standards

Grades 1 & 2, Stage A

  • 14A – Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.
    • Name the rules and responsibilities that students have at home, in school, and in public places.
    • Describe rules that help students treat each other fairly.
    • Demonstrate ways students help each other (e.g., taking turns and sharing).
    • Explain the consequences of breaking rules.
    • Give an example of a fair resolution to a conflict among people.
  • 14B – Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States and other nations.
    • Identify persons who are authority figures in their home, school, and community.
    • Describe a person who provides positive leadership for others.
    • Name a person who has served as President of the United States.
    • Identify a type of official who has an office or role within a government (e.g., major, Congressman, President).
    • o Name a duty, job, or responsibility of a government (e.g., protection of the people, make  laws).
  • 14C – Students who meet the standard can understand election processes and responsibilities of citizens.
    • Discuss decision-making in their lives.
    • Describe a situation where people vote to resolve their differences and decide what to do.
    • Lead a class vote over something the class would like to do.
    • Explain why majority rule is used in group decision-making (e.g., voting for food at a class party).
  • 14D – Students who meet the standard can understand the roles and influences of individuals and interest groups in the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
    • Name a student or parent group that serves their school.
    • Describe a person in the community who helps to improve the lives of others (e.g., community center director, day care providers).
    • Identify a government official or public servant carrying out their duties or responsibilities (e.g., a police officer arresting a criminal, lifeguard teaching swimming at the city pool).
  • 14F – Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
    • Give reasons for being honest and truthful when talking and working with other people.
    • State the benefits of showing respect for the ideas and property of others.
    • Name a holiday with political significance.
    • Identify a patriotic symbol of the United States (e.g., flag, bald eagle).
    • Describe what freedom means.
    • Recite the Pledge of Allegiance.
  • 16B – Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
    • Name commemorative holidays and festivals.
    • Explain why important people and events are remembered on holidays.
    • Tell how a past event has influenced their life.
    • Tell about a current political event in the world today.
    • Tell how people were governed in the past (e.g., what did kings do? What did nobles do? What rights did people have?).

Grades 1, 2 & 3, Stage B

  • 14A – Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States Government.
    • Tell about some rules and responsibilities that students have in school to help promote order and safety.
    • Name some of the benefits of sharing and taking turns during games and groups activities.
    • Explain why schools have rules to help students learn.
    • Produce new rules that could apply to students’ lives at home or school.
    • Demonstrate examples of honesty and fairness when playing or working with other students.
    • Give an example of how governments help people live safely and fairly.
    • Identify why people need governments to help organize and protect people.
  • 14B – Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States and other nations.
    • Identify the officials and political bodies that form the organization of their local government mayor, police chief, justice of the peace).
    • Name the current President of the United States.
    • Identify importance services provided by local governments to people (e.g., police and fire protection, parks departments).
  • 14C – Students who meet the standard can understand election processes and responsibilities of citizens.
    • Discuss a situation in their home or school that illustrate people being responsible in their duties or job.
    • List examples of responsible student classroom behavior.
    • Summarize the outcome of classroom decision-making in terms of what was decided by the majority of the students.
    • Identify elected leaders (e.g., mayor, governor, president).
  • 14D – Students who meet the standard can understand the roles and influences of individuals and interest groups in the political system of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
    • Identify a student or parent group that serves the school.
    • State the interests of students and adults involved in a school project (e.g., a fund raising activity to buy and build new playground equipment for their school).
    • Tell how a student should express ideas in a respectful manner to another student or to teachers.
    • Recognize the responsibilities of local government.
  • 14F – Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
    • Identify an example of behavior that shows someone showing good citizenship (e.g., recycling, being honest when being questioned).
    • Give an example of people being honest and truthful when working with others.
    • Describe how a holiday such as the Fourth of July represents the idea of freedom.
    • Describe how a holiday such as Veteran’s Day represents the idea of sacrifice to preserve freedom.
    • State reasons why people benefit from basic rights such as freedom of speech.
  • 16B – Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
    • Identify key individuals and events in the development of the local community (e.g., Founders’ days, names of parks, streets, public buildings).
    • Identify a local historical monument or place.
    • Explain how an event in United States political history is related to a current community event or issue.
    • Identify significant political figures or groups from the past.
    • Name significant political ideas from the past.
    • Tell about a political event featured in a folk take, story, or legend (e.g., King Arthur, King Midas).

Grades 2, 3 & 4, Stage C

  • 14A – Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.
    • Distinguish between different kinds of rules and responsibilities as applied in the home, school, and community.
    • Identify some class or school rules that were determined through democratic decision-making.
    • Explain some reasons for having rules and laws governing the lives of people.
    • Identify the names of people who occupy government offices in their community, state, and federal government.
    • Explain why people vote and run for political offices in a democracy.
    • Name historical figures from diverse backgrounds who advanced rights of individuals and groups to promote the common good.
  • 14B – Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
    • Identify current leaders within their local governments.
    • Name both the current President and Vice President of the United States.
    • List the names for the levels of government found throughout the United States (city, county, state, federal, or national).
    • List the three branches of government found within the state and federal government.
    • State the names of the two houses of the U.S. Congress.
  • 14C – Students who meet the standard can understand election processes and responsibilities of citizens.
    • List examples of various ways responsible students work together to help classmates.
    • Identify examples of rights and responsibilities students share within a school.
    • Predict the benefits of acting responsibly in their classroom.
    • Describe ways in which more than one classroom can work together to help their school.
    • Determine rules for choosing classroom leaders.
    • Compose a definition for the term “representation.”
    • Explain why in a democracy people choose to vote on important issues or for offices.
  • 14D – Students who meet the standard can understand the roles and influences of individuals and interest groups in the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
    • Explain what is meant by the idea of “the common good of the people.”
  • 14F – Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
    • Identify examples of people who are famous for being honest and truthful (e.g., Abraham Lincoln returning change).
    • Define the concept of “Patriotism.”
    • Identify reasons why people have chosen a democracy for their plan of government.
    • Define the concept of “liberty.”
    • Identify an artistic expression (e.g., song, painting, film) that illustrates the traditions important to our political system and concept of freedom.
    • Explain the purpose of the Pledge of Allegiance.
  • 16B – Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
    • Arrange a series of significant events in United States political history in chronological order (e.g., American Revolution, Civil War, World War II).
    • Describe events and ideas in the life of a significant political figure or group from the past whose holiday we celebrate today.
  • 16D – Students who meet the standard understand Illinois, United States, and world social history.
    • Arrange a series of significant events in United States social history in chronological order (e.g., Colonial slavery, freeing the slaves, women’s right to vote).

Grades 3, 4 & 5, Stage D

  • 14A – Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.
    • List reasons for forming a government.
    • Describe the purpose of the Declaration of Independence, and the Illinois and United States Constitutions.
    • Recite basic rights of citizens and restrictions upon government afforded to Americans through the Bill of Rights.
    • Defend the position that people in a democracy must have such rights as freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion, or freedom of assembly.
  • 14B – Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
    • Compose a definition for a “national government.”
    • Summarize the function of the three branches of government found within the state and federal government.
    • Distinguish between the powers and responsibilities of local, state, and federal government.
  • 14C – Students who meet the standard can understand election processes and responsibilities of citizens.
    • Explain the significance of the rights and responsibilities students share within a school.
    • Explain why a person might choose to vote for one candidate for President of the United States over another candidate.
    • Identify historical events during which various groups have won their right to participate within the electoral process (e.g., 15th and 19th Amendments).
  • 14F – Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
    • Describe values that have formed the foundation of our American democratic system (e.g., the love of liberty, respect for individual rights).
    • Summarize the meaning of the words, sounds, or images in an artistic expression that illustrates the traditions important to our political system and concept of freedom (e.g., music and lyrics to the Star Spangled Banner, painting of George Washington crossing the Delaware River).
    • Explain the significance of political symbols and mottoes of the United States (e.g., E Pluribus Unum, the Flag, the Statue of Liberty, the bald eagle, the Great Seal, oaths of office).
  • 16B – Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
    • Place a series of political events in their proper location on a timeline of United States history.
    • List the contributions of significant figures in United States political history (e.g., Thomas Jefferson’s writing of the Declaration of Independence).
    • Explain why significant events in United States political history are important today.
    • Interpret the symbolism of the images/icons found on historical memorials, murals, or monuments.

Grades 4, 5 & 6, Stage E

  • 14A – Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.
    • Give examples of civic and personal responsibilities of students and adults.
    • Explain the characteristics of a “democracy.”
    • Justify why governments need to make rules and laws for people.
    • Explain the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Illinois and United States Constitutions.
    • Define the concept of “unalienable” as it relates to rights expressed in the Declaration of Independence.
    • Explain how the U.S. Constitution can be amended.
    • Defend the idea of having a Bill of Rights to outline and protect the rights of citizens.
    • Summarize the evolution of one of the amendments to the constitution (e.g., its origins, implementation, influence).
    • Define rule of law.
  • 14B – Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
    • Describe the purpose behind the principles of division and sharing powers among the executive, legislative, and judicial branches.
    • Describe the system of checks and balances between the three branches of the federal government.
    • Differentiate between the characteristics of criminal and civil trials.
  • 14C – Students who meet the standard can understand election processes and responsibilities of citizens.
    • Describe situations in their home, school, or community where the rights of minorities have been respected.
    • Predict the consequences of ignoring the rights of other people in public places (e.g., smoking in a crowded theater).
    • Identify voting requirements.
  • 14F – Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
    • Describe examples of the development of basic freedoms for the people of the United States.
    • Discuss consistencies and inconsistencies expressed in United States political traditions and actual practices (e.g., freedom of speech, the right to bear arms, slavery, voting rights).
    • Compare the similarities found in national symbols, legends, or stories that have emphasized the value of such principles as freedom, liberty, preservation of the Union, etc.
    • Describe historical examples featuring the denial or extension of civil rights to various individuals or groups.
  • 16B – Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
    • Identify turning points in United States political history.
    • Summarize the causes and effects of ideas and actions of significant political figures during the Colonial Period.
    • Analyze political events, figures, and ideas in the colonies that led to the American Revolution.
    • List the key figures, events, and ideas in the development of the United States government during the Early National Period.
    • Identify turning points in world political history.
    • Describe major developments in the evolution of Western political systems (e.g., Greek democracy, Roman republic, Magna Carta and Common Law, the Enlightenment).
    • Analyze the consequences of political ideas and actions taken by significant individuals in the past.

Grades 5, 6 & 7, Stage F

  • 14A – Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.
    • Define the concept of “consent of the governed.”
    • Explain the importance of having a written constitution for a government.
    • Summarize the main points in constitutional documents (e.g., Declaration of Independence, Northwest Ordinance, Preamble of the United States Constitution).
    • Identify the basic similarities and differences between the Illinois and United States Constitutions.
    • Name the courts and judicial officials established to operate within the local, state, and federal governments.
    • Distinguish between the characteristics of a limited and unlimited government.
  • 14B – Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
    • Describe the characteristics of a two-house legislature.
    • Explain the reasons for having the system of checks and balances as part of the organization of the federal government.
    • Explain the distributed and shared powers of the local, state, and federal government.
  • 14C – Students who meet the standard can understand election processes and responsibilities of citizens.
    • Analyze historical events involving the extension or denial of political and electoral rights of various citizens or groups of people.
  • 14F – Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
    • Give examples of events where people have had to fight to win their equality.
    • Illustrate conflicts over the rights and freedom of competing individuals or groups (e.g., a novel about two families from the north and south during the Civil War).
    • Compare the arguments of competing public interest groups on constitutional rights (e.g., rights of gun owners versus those who advocate greater restrictions on gun ownership).
  • 16B – Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
    • Describe both the ideas and actions of significant political figures, events, or processes that affected the formation and development of modern political parties.
    • Interpret the actions and consequences of a significant figure in United States political history (e.g., Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt).
    • Compare/contrast the development of a political system and/or institution in ancient times with that of another political system and/or institution of ancient times (e.g., Greek and Roman government, Greek and Egyptian).

Grades 6, 7 & 8, Stage G

  • 14A – Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.
    • Compare and contrast responsibilities shared between the state and federal governments.
    • Identify the rights and principles of limited government found within the Declaration of Independence.
    • Classify the type of courts and judicial officials established to operate within the local, state, and federal governments.
    • Describe the role of the courts in judicial review.
  • 14B – Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
    • Describe the impact of the federal government’s system of checks and balances (e.g., the results of a presidential veto).
    • Analyze historical examples of the system of checks and balances according to the respective branches of the federal government.
    • Compare similarities and differences in the powers of the Governor of the State of Illinois and the President of the United States to resolve conflicts and crises.
    • Formulate a conclusion about the use of power by state or national governmental executives.
    • Define “jurisdiction” as it applies to a court system.
  • 14F – Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
    • Provide an argument justifying the need for civil rights for citizens of any nation.
    • Summarize the historical development of the concept of individual liberty (e.g., Colonial America to contemporary political interest groups).
    • Analyze the causes and effects of when national interests have called for the limitation or restriction of civil rights (e.g., internment of Japanese Americans during World War II).
  • 16B – Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
    • Identify the major periods in United States political history from colonial to contemporary times.
    • Summarize ideas that influenced the development of representative democracy as reflected in the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States.
    • Describe significant events that fostered the development of representative democracy after the adoption of the United States Constitution (e.g., amendments, supreme court rulings, legislation).
    • Compare and contrast the contributions of individuals or political groups who had a significant impact on the course of local, state, and national history.

Grades 7, 8 & 9, Stage H

  • 14A – Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.
    • Compare the similarities and differences in the state of Illinois and the national government’s attempts to protect individual rights and still promote the common good.
    • Explain the influence of the Supreme Court and significant court decisions on the rights and responsibilities of citizens (e.g., defining, expanding, and limiting individual rights).
    • Analyze the efforts of our court system to take into account the rights of both those accused of crimes and their victims.
  • 14B – Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
    • Compare the powers and responsibilities of the members of the House of Representatives and Senate within the United States Congress.
    • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of our federal system’s separation of powers.
    • Differentiate among the powers, limitations, and responsibilities of the state government of Illinois and the federal government.
    • Distinguish between the powers and responsibilities of our state and federal courts as outlined in our state and national constitutions.
    • Justify why the Illinois Constitution cannot violate the United States Constitution.
  • 14C – Students who meet the standard can understand election processes and responsibilities of citizens.
    • Analyze an example of a government denying voting rights to individuals or groups.
  • 14F – Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
    • Summarize the historical influences on the development of political ideas and practices as listed in the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the Illinois Constitution.
    • Give examples of how United States political ideas and traditions have either included or denied additional amendments respecting or extending the rights of its citizens.
    • Analyze an influential U.S. Supreme Court case decision and the impact it had in promoting or limiting civil rights.
    • Compare arguments for expanding or limiting freedoms and protection for citizens outlined in the Bill of Rights.
  • 16B – Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
    • Evaluate the consequences of constitutional change and continuity over time.
    • Summarize the significant events that occurred during the development of the Supreme Court of the United States.
    • Describe the contributions of individuals or groups who had a significant impact on the course of judicial history.
    • Identify common political trends in the eastern and western hemispheres after 1500 CE (e.g., colonization, de-colonization, nationalism).
    • Analyze the political cause and effect relationships created by European exploration and expansion in the eastern and western hemispheres.
    • Identify the contributions of significant individuals to worldwide political thought (e.g., Locke, Burke, Marx) after 1500.

Grades 8, 9 & 10, Stage I

  • 14A – Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.
    • Analyze how local, state, and national governments serve the purposes for which they were created.
    • Summarize the historical development of rights and responsibilities contained within the Bill of Rights and later amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
    • Predict potential changes in contemporary interpretations of the Bill of Rights.
  • 14B – Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
    • Describe how various nations have pursued, established, and maintained democratic forms of government over time.
    • Compare executive and legislative branches of our federal government with those of a parliamentary government (e.g., the United Kingdom).
    • Categorize the similarities and differences among world political systems (e.g., democracy, socialism, communism).
  • 14F – Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
    • Describe significant historical events and processes that brought about changes in the political ideas and traditions of the United States (e.g., Civil War, the New Deal).
    • Trace the ideology, events, individuals, and groups that influenced the adoption of amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
    • Evaluate the effect an historic speech had in changing people’s ideas about political involvement or their rights (e.g., John Kennedy’s Inaugural Speech, “Ask not”).
    • Hypothesize about the impact of the extension of greater voting rights through such steps as motor-voter registration, registration and voting over the Internet, etc.
    • Analyze the evolution of a particular political tradition that still influences modern political discourse.
    • Distinguish between the advantages and disadvantages of federal, confederate, and unitary systems of government found across the course of United States History within the United States.
    • Analyze the changing role of the judiciary in defining citizen’s rights and responsibilities.
    • Describe the evolution of criminals and victims’ rights within our judicial system.
  • 16B – Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
    • Compare/contrast the causes and effects of significant political events in a period of United States history.
    • Summarize how principles of the United States Constitution were applied to resolve a political conflict (e.g., states rights, civil rights).
    • Evaluate how the forces of cooperation and conflict have affected the development of representative democracy.
    • Describe the significant political ideas that are rooted in the Renaissance and Enlightenment periods.
    • Compare/contrast the development of democratic systems with other kinds of political systems.
  • 16D – Students who meet the standard understand Illinois, United States, and world social history.
    • Compare and contrast the actions of political, social, and economic institutions before and after the abolition of slavery.
    • Appraise the long-term effects, including unintended consequences, on American society that occurred as a result of watershed events in American social history.
    • Analyze the social history aspects of significant events in world history since 1500 (e.g., colonization, Protestant Reformation, industrialization, rise of technology, human rights movement, Holocaust).

Grades 11 & 12, Stage J

  • 14A – Students who meet the standard can understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.
    • Describe how changing interpretations of the powers and limitations of our Constitution have affected rights and responsibilities of groups and individuals.
    • Evaluate the relationship that can exist between local, state, and national governments concerning majority rule and minority rights.
    • Describe contemporary controversies regarding the principle of federalism and states rights.
    • Analyze the fundamental principles of our political system that often come into conflict (e.g., rule of law, liberty and equality, individual rights and the common good, separation of powers, majority rule and minority rights).
    • Evaluate how fundamental political principles (e.g., separation of powers, checks and balances, individual rights, and federalism) led to the development of democratic government in the United States and Illinois.
    • Analyze significant U.S. Supreme Court decisions that address equal protection and due process issues.
  • 14B – Students who meet the standard can understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and other nations.
    • Compare the government under the Articles of Confederation and contemporary confederated governments and organizations (e.g., the United Nations, Organization of American States, Organization of African States, and the European Union).
    • Compare and contrast the constitutional democracy of the United States with those of similar governments (e.g., United Kingdom, Japan, Australia).
    • Hypothesize about the changes that may occur within representative democracies in an increasingly diverse ethnic population.
    • Critique how different forms of political systems throughout the world have tended to protect or violate basic human rights of people.
    • Evaluate how cultural beliefs affect citizenship.
  • 14F – Students who meet the standard can understand the development of United States political ideas and traditions.
    • Describe the ideological origins of representative democracy within the cultural traditions of ancient Greece and Rome.
    • Analyze the historical evolution of a political tradition and how it was transformed by varying geographical, economic, technological, and social forces (e.g., political caucus, voting patterns for political parties within different regions of the United States).
    • Assess the advantages and disadvantages of the establishment of a free press.
    • Describe the impact of the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 on the political development of the United States, the Midwest, and specifically Illinois.
    • Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of negative rights (inherent rights that the government cannot take away) and positive rights (a right provided by the government) (e.g., Congress cannot make a law that denies freedom of religion; the right to vote extended to women).
    • Analyze examples of the success or failure of individuals or groups to influence change or maintain continuity within a political party or government system.
    • Evaluate how changing geographical, economic, technological, and social forces affect United States political ideas and traditions (e.g., freedom, equality and justice, individual rights).
  • 16B – Students who meet the standard understand the development of significant political events.
    • Assess the significance of a watershed event in United States political history.
    • Compare/contrast the initial philosophy of a political institution or group with its later and/or contemporary philosophy.
    • Describe examples of continuity and change in political institutions at the local, state, and national levels.
    • Analyze the changing roles of political offices and institutions in United States history.
    • Assess how political ideology influences the political perspective of contemporary politicians or groups. Analyze how changes in the economy, environment, and social structure have influenced the current political structure of the United States.