Maine

Maine Revised Statutes, Title 20-A Education:

20-A M.R.S. §4722 High School Diploma Standards: 2 years of social studies and history, including American history, government and civics

Maine Citizenship Education Policies:

“One credit in American history and government shall be required as part of a comprehensive course that includes instruction in the importance of voting, the privileges and responsibilities of citizenship, the Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence.”(CMR 05-071-127 §7.02)

“Students will learn the constitutional principles and the democratic foundations of national, state, and local systems and institutions. Further, students will learn how to exercise the rights and responsibilities of participation in civic life and to analyze and evaluate public policies. This understanding entails insight into political power, how it is distributed and expressed, the types and purposes of governments, and their relationships with the governed. Political relationships among the United States and other nations are also included in this content area.” (Maine Civics and Government Standards)

Maine Social Studies Standards

Pre-K to Grade 2

  • Civics and Government, B1, Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns of Civics/Government: Students understand key ideas and processes that characterize democratic government in the community and the United States.
    • Describe and provide examples of democratic ideals.
    • Recognize symbols, monuments, celebrations, and leaders of local, State, and national government.
    • Identify community workers and volunteers and the roles they play in promoting the common good.
  • Civics and Government, B2, Rights, Duties, Responsibilities, and Citizen Participation in Government: Students understand the concepts of rights, duties, responsibilities, and participation.
    • Describe classroom rights, duties, and responsibilities including how students participate in some classroom decisions and are obliged to follow classroom rules.
    • Explain the purpose of school/classroom rules and laws encountered in daily experiences to promote the common good and the peaceful resolution of conflict.

Grades 3-5

  • Civics and Government, B1, Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns of Civics/Government: Students understand the basic ideals, purposes, principles, structures, and processes of democratic government in Maine and the United States.
    • Explain that the study of government includes how governments are organized and how citizens participate.
    • Explain and provide examples of democratic ideals and constitutional principles to include the rule of law, legitimate power, and common good.
    • Explain and give examples of governmental structures including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches and the local, State, and national levels of government.
    • Explain how leaders are elected and how laws are made and implemented.
    • Explain that the structures and processes of government are described in documents, including the Constitutions of Maine and the United States.
  • Civics and Government, B2, Rights, Duties, Responsibilities, and Citizen Participation in Government: Students understand the basic rights, duties, responsibilities, and roles of citizens in a democracy.
    • Identify the rights, duties, and responsibilities of citizens within the class, school, or community.
    • Identify and describe the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights as documents that establish government and protect the rights of the individual United States citizen.
    • Provide examples of how people influence government and work for the common good including voting, writing to legislators, performing community service, and engaging in civil disobedience.

Grades 6-8

  • Civics and Government, B1, Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns of Civics/Government: Students understand the basic ideals, purposes, principles, structures, and processes of constitutional government in Maine and the United States as well as examples of other forms of government in the world.
    • Explain that the study of government includes the structures and functions of government and the political and civic activity of citizens.
  • Analyze examples of democratic ideals and constitutional principles that include the rule of law, legitimate power, and common good.
  • Describe the structures and processes of United States government and government of the State of Maine and how these are framed by the United States Constitution, the Maine Constitution, and other primary sources.
  • Explain the concepts of federalism and checks and balances and the role these concepts play in the governments of the United States and Maine as framed by the United States Constitution, the Maine Constitution and other primary sources.
  • Compare how laws are made in Maine and at the federal level in the United States.
  • Compare the structures and processes of United States government with examples of other forms of government.
  • Civics and Government, B2, Rights, Duties, Responsibilities, and Citizen Participation in Government: Students understand constitutional and legal rights, civic duties and responsibilities, and roles of citizens in a constitutional democracy.
    • Explain the constitutional and legal status of “citizen” and provide examples of rights, duties, and responsibilities of citizens.
    • Describe how the powers of government are limited to protect individual rights and minority rights as described in the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights.
    • Analyze examples of the protection of rights in court cases or from current events.
    • Analyze how people influence government and work for the common good including voting, writing to legislators, performing community service, and engaging in civil disobedience.
  • History (E), Historical Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns (E1): Students understand major eras, major enduring themes, and historic influences in the history of Maine, the United States, and various regions of the world.
    • c. Trace and explain the history of democratic ideals and constitutional principles and their importance in the history of the United States and the world.

Grades 9-12

  • Civics and Government (B), Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns of Civics/Government (B1): students understand the ideals, purposes, principles, structures, and processes of constitutional government in the United States and in the American political system, as well as examples of other forms of government and political systems in the world.
    • Explain that the study of government includes the structures, functions, institutions, and forms of government and the relationship of government to citizens in the United States and in other regions of the world.
    • Evaluate current issues by applying democratic ideals and constitutional principles of government in the United States, including checks and balances, federalism, and consent of the governed as put forth in founding documents.
    • Explain how and why democratic institutions and interpretations of democratic ideals and constitutional principles change over time.
    • Describe the purpose, structures, and processes of the American political system.
    • Compare the American political system with examples of political systems from other parts of the world.
  • Civics and Government (B), Rights, Duties, Responsibilities, and Citizen Participation in Government (B2): Students understand the constitutional and legal rights, the civic duties and responsibilities, and roles of citizens in a constitutional democracy and the role of citizens living under other forms of government in the world.
    • Explain the relationship between constitutional and legal rights, and civic duties and responsibilities in a constitutional democracy.
    • Evaluate the relationship between the government and the individual as evident in the United States Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and landmark court cases.
    • Analyze the constitutional principles and the roles of the citizen and the government in major laws or cases.
    • Compare the rights, duties, and responsibilities of United States citizens with those of citizens from other nations.
    • Evaluate how people influence government and work for the common good including voting, writing to legislators, performing community service, and engaging in civil disobedience.
  • History (E), Historical Knowledge, Concepts, Themes, and Patterns (E1): Students understand major eras, major enduring themes, and historic influences in United States and world history, including the roots of democratic philosophy, ideals, and institutions in the world.
    • Trace and critique the roots and evolution of democratic ideals and constitutional principles in the history of the United States and the world using historical sources.