Mississippi

Mississippi Public School Accountability Standards, 2012:

Appendix A-3, Standard 20, Graduation Requirements: 3 Carnegie units of social studies to include 1 credit of US History, ½ credit of U.S. Government and ½ credit of Mississippi Studies. (page 41)

 

Mississippi Social Studies Framework

Kindergarten

  • Domestic Affairs
    • Understand that ideas are represented by symbols.
      • Identify school, community, state and national symbols (e.g., school mascot, community logo, Mississippi state flag, United States flag, American eagle, etc.).
      • Identify the pledge of allegiance and patriotic songs as expressions of patriotism.
  • Civil/Human Rights
    • Understand the concept of rights and responsibilities of a good citizen.
      • Define the terms —rights and —responsibility.
      • Distinguish between rights and responsibilities of individuals in relation to different social groups including, family, peer group, and classmates (e.g., courteous public behavior, honesty, self-control, respect for the rights and property of others, fairness, etc.).
      • Name figures of authority and their position in upholding human and civil rights (e.g., parents, teachers, principal). State the importance of classroom and school rules and the consequences of failing to obey them (e.g., raising hand before speaking to eliminate noise and allow every person to be heard; follow school/classroom rules to prevent accidents).

Grade 1

  • Domestic Affairs
    • Understand the symbols, icons, and traditions of community, state, and nation.
      • Identify and explain the meaning of state and national symbols, icons, and traditions (e.g., the United States flag, bald eagle, Statue of Liberty, Uncle Sam, George Washington, Thanksgiving, saluting the flag, parades, etc.).
      • Explain the general meaning of the pledge of allegiance.
      • Identify and discuss songs that express the ideals of the United States of America.
  • Civil/Human Rights
    • Understand the rights and individual responsibilities of members of families and schools.
      • Give examples of the terms —rights and —responsibility.
      • Explain why all humans have rights and responsibilities.
      • Demonstrate responsible behavior of individuals in different social groups including, family, peer group, and classmates (e.g., courteous public behavior, honesty, self-control, respect for the rights and property of others, fairness, etc.).
      • Identify and discuss the roles of figures of authority in upholding human and civil rights (e.g., parents, teachers, principal).
      • Explain the necessity of rules and laws and the consequences of failing to obey them (e.g., raising hand before speaking to eliminate noise and allow every person to be heard; follow school/classroom rules to prevent accidents).

Grade 2

  • Domestic Affairs
    • Understand the concept and development of government.
      • Define the terms —government and—voting.
      • Identify the positions and persons who hold local, state, and national offices (e.g., Mayor, Governor, and President).
      • Explain the voting process and how results are used.
      • Identify the services provided by the government (public schools, fire departments, police departments).
  • Civil/Human Rights
    • Understand the importance of individual actions and character traits that contribute to advancing civil/human rights.
      • Compare and contrast the terms —rights and —responsibilities.
      • Define and give examples of some of the rights students have in the school (e.g., students have the right to come to school, to ask questions, to vote in class elections).
      • Discuss the responsibilities of individuals in schools (e.g., respect for the rights and property of others, tolerance, honesty, self-control, compassion, participation in the democratic process, work for the common good, fairness, etc.).
      • Explain the role of people in authority (e.g., police officers, city officials, community leaders) in upholding human and civil rights.
      • Participate in the development of classroom rules and defining the consequences of failing to obey them.

Grade 3

  • Domestic Affairs
    • Understand the role of rules and laws in our daily lives and the basic structure of the government at the local level.
      • Describe the three branches of government at the local level.
      • Explain how and why the local government makes laws, carries out laws, determines whether laws have been violated, and determines consequences for those who break the laws.
        Explain the purpose of rules and laws and why they are important to a community (e.g. littering, noise, etc.).
        Identify services provided by local government.
        Discuss spatial and ecological perspectives in life situations (e.g., locating waste disposal in the community, organizing a recycling drive, measuring food disposal at the school, etc.).
  • Civil Rights/Human Rights
    • Understand the historical circumstances and conditions of civil human rights struggles in local communities.
      • Identify important beliefs commonly held by Americans about themselves and their government (e.g., following individual rights and freedoms, common good, respect for law, importance of work, education, volunteerism, conflict resolutions, etc.).
      • Explain why certain civic responsibilities (e.g., following civic protocol, celebrating historic figures, etc.) are important to individuals and to the community.
      • Describe different ways people in a community can influence their local government. (e.g., voting, running for office, or participating in meetings).

Grade 4

  • Domestic Affairs
    • Understand the purpose, roles, and responsibilities of state and federal government.
      • Distinguish among the three branches of government and their roles at local, county, state, and national levels.
      • Explain how and why the state government makes, carries out, and enforces laws.
      • Explain the responsibilities of state government to protect, educate, and maintain the public welfare of its citizens (e.g., responding to natural disasters).
      • Demonstrate and analyze spatial and ecological perspectives in life situations (e.g., locating waste disposal in the community, organizing a recycling drive, etc.).
  • Civil Rights/Human Rights
    • Understand the roles, rights, and responsibilities of Mississippi citizens.
      • Distinguish between acceptable and unacceptable behaviors of a responsible citizen (e.g., courteous public behavior, respect for the rights and property of others, tolerance, self- control, participation in the democratic process, and respect for the environment, etc.).
      • Identify historical figures (e.g., Fannie Lou Hamer, Medgar Evers, and Martin Luther King Jr., etc.), circumstances (e.g., slavery, abolition, segregation and integration, etc.), and conditions(e.g., The Great Migration, Trail of Tears, Women‘s Suffrage, etc.) related to the struggle for civil/human rights in Mississippi and their impact on Mississippi‘s society.
      • Compare and contrast the benefits and challenges of unity and diversity among citizens of Mississippi.

Grade 5

  • Domestic Affairs
    • Understand the people, events, and types of government associated with the development of the United States.
      • Differentiate among pre-Columbian civilizations (e.g., cliff dwellers, Pueblo people of the desert Southwest, American Indians of the Pacific Northwest, nomadic nations of the Great Plains, and the Woodland Peoples east of the Mississippi River) regarding their location, religious practices, political structures, and use of slaves. (DOK 3)
      • Cite evidence of the earliest explorations of the Western Hemisphere by the Vikings, including locations and time frame of their explorations.
      • Identify significant European supporters (e.g.,King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella) and explorers (e.g., Cortez, Ponce de Leon, Hernando De Soto) and the settlements they established (e.g., Roanoke, Jamestown, Plymouth).
      • Connect the reasons for the establishment of the early colonies to the major individuals and groups responsible for the founding of those settlements (e.g., John Smith, Virginia; Roger Williams, Rhode Island; William Penn, Pennsylvania; Lord Baltimore, Maryland; William Bradford, Plymouth; John Winthrop, Massachusetts).
      • Discuss the structure of colonial governments (e.g., legislative bodies, town meetings, charters of individual freedoms and rights).
  • Civil Rights/Human Rights
    • Understand how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests influenced the founding of the United States.
      • Explain how the need for religious, political, and economic freedom influenced the settlement of North America by Europeans.
      • Analyze the relationship between early European settlers in America and the Native Americans they encountered in terms of conflict, cultural exchanges, property rights, and adoption of democratic ideas.
      • Critique the development and impact of slavery in North America, including the causes, conditions, and effects on enslaved Africans in North America.
      • Trace the development of democratic ideas that influenced the early colonies (e.g., Magna Carta and Mayflower Compact, etc.).

Grade 6

  • Domestic Affairs
    • Understand the responsibilities, duties, and functions of all three branches of government on a federal, state, and local level.
      • Differentiate among the three branches of government at the federal, state, and local level.
      • Explain and analyze the concepts of separation of powers and checks and balances among the three branches of state and national governments.
      • Research and summarize how the electoral process works in the United States government.
    • Understand individual and civic duties and responsibilities of citizens of the United States.
      • Explain and give examples of the differences between natural-born citizens, naturalized citizens, and non-citizens.
      • Differentiate between individual and civic duties/responsibilities of American citizens (e.g., Individual-respect for the rights of others, self-discipline, negotiation, compromise; Civic- respect for the law, patriotism, participation in the political process).
    • Understand how the United States can benefit by individual and collective participation and by public service.
      • Investigate and discuss examples of how citizens participate in the political process.
      • Explore and formulate a plan for civic and community action (e.g., recycling, supporting the military and veterans, helping the elderly, etc.).
  • Civil Rights/Human Rights
    • Understand the influences of historical documents (e.g., Magna Carta, Mayflower Compact, Declaration of Independence, Constitution, the Bill of Rights, the Emancipation Proclamation, etc.), events, and social movements on the rights of American citizens.
      • Compare and contrast the essential ideas of various historical documents that are important in shaping the values of American Democracy.
      • Analyze how various philosophers influenced the writing of America‘s historical documents.
      • Analyze political and social impacts of civil rights movements throughout the history of the United States (e.g., demonstrations, individual and group resistance, organizing efforts, and collective action/unity).
      • Explain and analyze the current state of civil and human rights for all people in our nation (e.g., people with disabilities, minorities, gender, etc.).
      • Explain how conflict, cooperation, and interdependence (e.g., social justice, diversity, mutual respect, and civic engagement) among groups, societies, and nations influenced the writing of early historical documents.

Grade 7

  • Civil Rights/Human Rights
    • Understand the civil and human development of various civilizations of Asia, Europe, and Africa from rise to fall.
      • Cite evidence of human social relations as to the cause of the fall of civilizations of Asia, Europe and Africa.
      • Describe the relationship among various groups of people (e.g., peasants and aristocracy, dictators and common people, monarchs and subjects, men and women, Christians and Muslims, etc.) and how it may have characterized the societies in various regions in of Europe, Asia, and Africa from the fall of the Roman Empire through the Middle Ages.
      • Analyze the evolution of human rights throughout the history of various civilizations (e.g., Hammurabi‘s Code, Plebeians of Rome, Magna Carta, etc.)

Grade 8

  • Domestic Affairs
    • Understand the major events, actors and ideas that precipitated the founding of the nation and relate their significance to the development of American constitutional democracy.
      • Describe the relationship between the moral and political ideas of the Great Awakening, the Enlightenment, and Western Political philosophies and the development of revolutionary sentiment among the colonists.
      • Analyze the philosophy of government expressed in the Declaration of Independence, with an emphasis on government as a means of protecting individual rights (e.g., phrases such as
        —all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights).
      • Explain major events (The Stamp Act, The Intolerable Acts, Boston Tea Party, First Continental Congress, etc.) that led to the beginning of the American Revolutionary War.
      • Compare and contrast the major documents and works (e.g., Magna Carta, Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, the United States Constitution, Bill of Rights, the Federalist Papers, etc.) that laid the foundation for American democracy.
      • Describe and explain the role of the Founding Fathers (e.g., Washington, Adams, Hamilton, Jefferson) and their impact on the development of America‘s political landscape.
  • Civil Rights/Human Rights
    • Understand the impact of American ideals and institutions on the development of American democracy.
      • Analyze how conflict, cooperation, and interdependence (e.g., social justice, diversity, mutual respect, and civic engagement) among groups, societies, and nations influenced the writing of early historical documents.
      • Study the lives of formerly enslaved African Americans who gained freedom in the North and founded schools and churches to advance their rights and communities.
      • Examine the women‘s suffrage movement (e.g., biographies, writings, and speeches of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Margaret Fuller, Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony).
      • Research and analyze political and social impacts of civil rights movements throughout the history of the United States pre-Reconstruction era (e.g., slave revolts, abolitionist movement, protests over British taxation in the colonies, individual and group resistance, organizing efforts, and collective action/unity).

Grades 9-12: US Government (Required)

  • Domestic Affairs
    • Understand the fundamental principles and moral values of American democracy as expressed in the U.S. Constitution and other important documents of American democracy.
      • Explain how the U.S. Constitution calls for a system of shared powers, specifies the role of organized interests, details checks and balances, and explains the importance of an independent judiciary, enumerated powers, rule of law, federalism, and civilian control of the military.
      • Explain how the Founding Fathers‘ realistic view of human nature led directly to the establishment of a constitutional system that limited the power of the governors and the governed.
    • Understand the roles and responsibilities of the three branches of government as established by the U.S. Constitution.
      • Analyze Article I of the Constitution as it relates to the legislative branch, including eligibility for office and lengths of terms of representatives and senators; election to office; the roles of the House and Senate in impeachment proceedings; the role of the vice president; the enumerated legislative powers; and the process by which a bill becomes a law.
      • Analyze Article II of the Constitution as it relates to the executive branch, including eligibility for office and length of term, election to and removal from office, the oath of office, and the enumerated executive powers.
      • Analyze Article III of the Constitution as it relates to judicial branch, including the length of terms of judges and the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court.
      • Understand the meaning, scope, and limits of rights and obligations of democratic citizenship and that the relationships among democratic citizens and government are mutable.
      • Explain the individual‘s legal obligations to obey the law, serve as a juror, and pay taxes.
      • Explain the obligations of civic-mindedness, including voting, being informed on civic issues, volunteering and performing public service, and serving in the military or alternative service.
      • Explain how one becomes a citizen of the United States, including the process of naturalization (e.g., literacy, language, and other requirements).
      • Explain how the Constitution can be amended.
  • CivilRights/Human Rights
    • Understand the role that governments play in the protection, expansion, and hindrance of civil/human rights of citizens.
      • Explain Supreme Court rulings that have resulted in controversies over changing interpretations of civil rights, including those in Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, Miranda v. Arizona, Regents of the University of California v. Bakke, Adarand Constructors, Inc. v. Pena, and United States v. Virginia (VMI).
      • Explain the importance of maintaining a balance between the following concepts: majority rule and individual rights; liberty and equality; state and national authority in a federal system; civil disobedience and the rule of law; freedom of the press and the right to a fair trial; and the relationship of religion and government.
      • Analyze the meaning and importance of each of the rights guaranteed under the Bill of Rights and landmark Amendments (e.g., 13th, 14th, 15th, 19th, 26th) and how each is secured (e.g., freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, petition, privacy).
  • Domestic Affairs
    • Understand the evolution of the American political system, its ideals, and institutions post- reconstruction.
      • Cite and analyze evidence that the United States Constitution is a living document as reflected in Supreme Court cases, Amendments, and presidential actions.
      • Analyze and evaluate the impact of presidential policies and congressional actions on domestic reform.
      • Explain and analyze the expansion of federal powers.
      • Analyze and evaluate the ongoing tension between individual liberty and national security.

Grades 9-12: African American Studies

Elective Course

  • Understand the role that racism has had in the development of United States society.
    • Explain the development of racial categories and how these categories have served to indicate power relationships among various racial groups in American society.
    • Analyze the full impact and legacy of slavery (i.e., slave trade, plantation life, slave commerce, legal sanctions/protections, resulting civil and cultural order, etc.) on the social and political development of the United States.
    • Trace the legacy and impact of legalized segregation and discrimination (Black Codes, Jim Crow, etc.) on the social structure of the United States.
    • Analyze the U.S. Government‘s response to changing racial understanding throughout the history of the United States (e.g., the 13th, 14th, and 15th Constitutional Amendments, Reconstruction, Plessy v. Fergusson, the Dred Scott case, Brown v. Board of Ed., the Bakke Case, etc.).