Nebraska

Nebraska Department of Education, Title 92, Nebraska Administrative Code:

92 NAC 10 § 003.05A4 Social Studies/History: “Thirty credit hours of social studies/history with course content that includes civics/government, geography, United States and world history, and economic concepts.”

Nebraska State Standards:

“Social studies promotes civic competence through the integrated study of the social sciences and humanities. The primary purpose of social studies is to help young people make informed and reasoned decisions for the public good as citizens of a culturally diverse, democratic society in an interdependent world.” Social studies standards are arranged around ten themes and include suggested course outline. (94 NAC 4)

 

Nebraska Social Studies Standards

Kindergarten

  • SS 0.1.1 Students will recognize the purpose of rules and the roles of authority figures.
    • SS 0.1.1.a Explain why rules are needed in family, school, and community (e.g., safety, to make learning possible, to protect freedoms). (Self)
    • SS 0.1.1.b Identify the roles of authority figures in family and school.
  • SS 0.1.2 Students will demonstrate good citizenship through knowledge of expected behavior.
    • SS 0.1.2.a Model citizenship skills (e.g., respect, courtesy, honesty, voting).
    • SS 0.1.2.b Identify patriotic symbols songs and actions (e.g., U.S. Flag, Pledge of Allegiance).
  • SS 0.4.2 Students will identify historical people, events, ideas, and symbols.
    • SS 0.4.2.a Identify the contributions of historical people and the impact of symbols, including various cultures and ethnic groups (e.g., George Washington, American flag, picture and name of current president).
    • SS 0.4.2.b Differentiate between stories from the present and the past.

Grade 1

  • SS 1.1.2 Students will understand characteristics of good citizenship by recognizing historical figures, holidays, and patriotic symbols.
    • SS 1.1.2.a Identify citizenship skills (e.g., responsibility, justice, equality, voting).
    • SS 1.1.2.b Identify patriotic symbols, songs, actions, celebrations, and holidays (e.g., U.S. Flag, Bald Eagle, Pledge of Allegiance, Thanksgiving, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, 4th of July, President’s Day).
    • SS 1.1.2.c Identify important historical and current government figures that exemplify civic engagement (e.g. Governors, Presidents).

Grade 2

  • SS 2.1.1 Students will identify and explain the responsibilities and rights of citizens in their communities.
    • SS 2.1.1.a Participate in developing rules that consider multiple points of view.
    • SS 2.1.1.b Describe how individuals, groups, and communities manage conflict and promote justice.
  • SS 2.1.2 Students will participate in making decisions using democratic traditions based on established rules.
    • SS 2.1.2.a Identify civic responsibilities that are important to individuals and their communities (e.g. voting, obeying laws).
    • SS 2.1.2.b Identify patriotic symbols, songs, actions, celebrations, and holidays (e.g., U.S. Flag, Bald Eagle, Pledge of Allegiance, Thanksgiving, Veteran’s Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, 4th of July, Memorial Day, President’s Day).
    • SS 2.1.2.c Describe ways to be actively engaged to improve family, school and community.
    • SS 2.1.2.d Identify characteristics of good citizenship (e.g., establishing beliefs and justice, truth, equality, personal responsibilities for the common good, tolerance for diversity of opinions).

Grade 3

  • SS 3.1.1 Students will identify and explain the structure and function of their local governments.
    • SS 3.1.1.a Identify the structure and functions of local government.
    • SS 3.1.1.b Describe the reasons for laws in our community.
    • SS 3.1.1.c Identify and explain a variety of roles leaders, citizens, and others play in local government.
  • SS 3.1.2 Students will understand the impact of individual and group decisions at a local level.
    • SS 3.1.2.a Identify rights and responsibilities of citizens (e.g., voting, public service projects,) at the local level.
    • SS 3.1.2.b Explain the meaning of patriotic symbols, songs, actions, celebrations, and holidays (e.g., U.S. Flag, Bald Eagle, Pledge of Allegiance, Thanksgiving, Veteran’s Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, 4th of July, Memorial Day, President’s Day, Flag Day).
    • SS 3.1.2.c Identify ways students can be engaged to have an impact in their local community.
  • SS 3.1.2.d Identify and describe the importance of listening to the views of others and sharing personal views in a respectful manner.
  • SS 3.1.2.e Identify local leaders and the impact of their decisions that effect public policy.
  • SS 3.2.10 Students will understand what goods and services local governments provide.
    • SS 3.2.10.a Identify goods and services funded through local taxes (e.g., snow removal, waste management, law enforcement).

Grade 4

  • SS 4.1.1 Students will identify and explain the foundation, structure, and function of Nebraska’s government.
    • SS 4.1.1.a Explain the historical foundation and the events that led to the formation and structure of Nebraska’s government (e.g., modeled from U.S. government, three branches of government).
    • SS 4.1.1.b Describe the origin, structure, and function of Nebraska’s unicameral government.
    • SS 4.1.1.c Understand how a bill becomes a law in the Nebraska unicameral.
    • SS 4.1.1.d Identify and explain a variety of roles leaders, citizens, and others play in the Nebraska government.
  • SS 4.2.10 Students will understand what goods and services state governments provide.
    • SS 4.2.10.a Identify goods and services funded through state taxes (e.g., highways, universities, human services, unemployment, courts).

Grade 5

  • SS 5.1.1 Students will describe the foundation, structure, and function of the United States government.
    • SS 5.1.1.a Explain the historical foundation that led to the formation of the United States constitutional government (e.g., early state constitutions, Declaration of Independence, and the Articles of Confederation).
    • SS 5.1.1.b Explain the origins, structure, and functions of the three branches of the United States government.
    • SS 5.1.1.c Describe how colonial and new states’ governments laws affected groups within their population (e.g., citizens, slaves, immigrants, women, class systems, tribes).
    • SS 5.1.1.d Describe how the decisions of the national government affect local and state government.
    • SS 5.1.1.e Identify the principles of the American Republic (e.g., liberty, democracy, United States Constitution, Bill of Rights).
    • SS 5.1.1.f Compare and contrast tribal forms of government, British monarchy, and early American colonial governments.
  • SS 5.1.2 Students will apply democratic principles that are the foundation of the United States government systems to daily life.
    • SS 5.1.2.a Explain the constitutional rights and civic responsibilities of U.S. citizens (e.g., freedom of speech, voting, staying informed of issues, respecting the rights, opinions, and beliefs of others, joining a civic group).
    • SS 5.1.2.b Describe the significance of patriotic symbols, songs and activities (e.g., Pledge of Allegiance, “The Star Spangled Banner”, “America”, commemorating state and national holidays).
    • SS 5.1.2.c Give examples of group and individual actions that illustrate civic ideas in the founding of the United States (e.g., freedom, rule of law, equality, civility, cooperation, respect).
    • SS 5.1.2.d Analyze how cooperation and conflict among people have contributed to political, economic, and social events and situations in the United States.
    • SS 5.1.2.e Identify the roles and influences of individuals, groups, and the media on governments (e.g., George Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin).
  • SS 5.4.2 Students will demonstrate an understanding of the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols upon US history using multiple types of sources.
    • SS 5.4.2.a Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols, including various cultures and ethnic groups, by era (e.g., Early America/Exploration: American Indian empires in Mesoamerica, the Southwest, and the Mississippi Valley, Coronado, DeSoto, LaSalle; Colonization and Rise of Democratic Institutions: Spanish Missions, French and Indian War: Chief Pontiac; Establishing a Nation: Revolutionary War; Founders and Founding Documents: unique nature of the creation and organization of the American Government, the United States as an exceptional nation based upon personal freedom, the inherent nature of citizens’ rights, and democratic ideals, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and other historical figures, patriotism, national symbols).
    • SS 5.4.2.b Describe how the United States and its neighbors in the Western Hemisphere have changed over the course of time using maps, documents, and other artifacts.
    • SS 5.4.2.c Describe the appropriate uses of primary and secondary sources.

Grades 6-8

  • SS 8.1.1 Students will summarize the foundation, structure, and function of the United States government.
    • SS 8.1.1.a Identify and describe different forms of government via the study of early and current civilizations (e.g., tribal, monarchy, democracy, republic, theocracy, and oligarchy).
    • SS 8.1.1.b Describe the structure and roles of government.
    • SS 8.1.1.c Identify the development of written laws and other documents (e.g., Hammurabi’s Code, Magna Carta, Declaration of Independence, United States Constitution, Preamble and Bill of Rights).
    • SS 8.1.1.d Explain how various government decisions impact people, places, and history.
    • SS 8.1.1.e Describe important government principals (e.g., freedom, democracy, equality, rule of law, popular sovereignty, justice).
    • SS 8.1.1.f Describe the history of political parties in the United States.
    • SS 8.1.1.g Compare civic life in the United States with other countries (e.g. England, China, Nigeria, India, Honduras).
    • SS 8.1.1.h Explain the ways in which governments meet the needs of citizens, manage conflict, and establish order and security.
  • SS 8.1.2 Students will describe the roles, responsibilities, and rights as local, state, national, and international citizens and participate in civic service.
    • SS 8.1.2.a Describe ways individuals participate in the political process (e.g., registering and voting, contacting government officials, campaign involvement).
    • SS 8.1.2.b Describe the significance of patriotic symbols, songs and activities (e.g., Pledge of Allegiance, “The Star Spangled Banner”, celebration of Memorial Day, Independence Day, Veteran’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, American Indian Day, Constitution Day).
    • SS 8.1.2.c Demonstrate civic engagement (e.g., service learning projects, volunteerism).
    • SS 8.1.2.d Evaluate how cooperation and conflict among people have contributed to political, economic, and social events and situations in the United States.
    • SS 8.1.2.e Identify the roles and influences of individuals, groups, and the media on governments (e.g., Seneca Falls Convention, Underground Railroad, Horace Greeley, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Jane Addams, Muckrackers, Booker T. Washington).
  • SS 8.4.2 (US) Students will analyze the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols upon US history using multiple types of sources.
    • SS 8.4.2.a (US) Analyze the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols, including various cultures and ethnic groups, on history in the United States by era (e.g., Establishing a Nation: Revolutionary War: Founders and Founding Documents: unique nature of the creation and organization of the American Government, the United States as an exceptional nation based upon personal freedom, the inherent nature of citizens’ rights, and democratic ideals, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and other historical figures, patriotism, national symbols; Expansion and Reform: land acquisition, Manifest Destiny, Standing Bear, Indian Removal Acts; Civil War/Reconstruction: Dred Scott, secession, acts and legislations, Civil War leaders; Industrialism: rise of corporations, growth of organized labor, assembly line, immigration; Transportation and Technology: Eli Whitney, John Deere, Thomas Edison, Alexander Graham Bell, George Washington Carver, Orville and Wilbur Wright).
    • SS 8.4.2.b (US) Analyze how the United States has changed over the course of time, using maps, documents, and other artifacts.
    • SS 8.4.2.c (US) Analyze the appropriate uses of primary and secondary sources.
  • SS 8.4.3 (US) Students will analyze and interpret historical and current events from multiple perspectives.
    • SS 8.4.3.a (US) Analyze and interpret how multiple perspectives facilitate the understanding of the full story of US history (e.g., Dawes Act, Chinese Exclusion Act, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, The Emancipation Proclamation, Organized Labor, Women’s Suffrage).
    • SS 8.4.3.b (US) Compare and contrast primary and secondary sources to better understand multiple perspectives of the same event (e.g., The Bill of Rights, slavery, Gettysburg Address, The New Colossus Poem, images, political cartoons, photographs, newspapers).
  • SS 8.4.4 (US) Students will identify causes of past and current events, issues, and problems.
    • SS 8.4.4.a (US) Analyze sources on Nineteenth-Century American History through determination of credibility, contextualization, and corroboration.
    • SS 8.4.4.b (US) Evaluate alternative courses of action in United States history (e.g., Why and how was land acquired?).
    • SS 8.4.4.c (US) Analyze how decisions affected events in the United States (e.g., Supreme Court decisions, immigration, declaration of war).
    • SS 8.4.4.d (US) Identify and analyze multiple causes and effects upon key events in US history (e.g., Antebellum, Kansas-Nebraska Act, Civil War/Reconstruction, Wounded Knee Massacre).
    • SS 8.4.4.e (US) Analyze the relationships among historical events in the United States and the students’ lives today (i.e., current events).

Grades 9-12

  • SS 12.1.1 Students will analyze and evaluate the foundation, structures, and functions of the United States government as well as local, state, and international governments.
    • SS 12.1.1.a Summarize the historical foundation that influenced the creation of the United States Constitution (e.g., philosophers, social contract theory, natural rights, Constitutional Convention, Federalist, and Anti-Federalist Papers).
    • SS 12.1.1.b Analyze and evaluate the structure of American constitutional government (e.g., federalism, democracy, representative government, branches of the government, separation of powers, checks and balances, amendment process, concurrent/enumerated/implied powers, electoral college).
    • SS 12.1.1.c Analyze and evaluate the functions of United States government (e.g., national security, legislative law-making, executive implementation, judicial interpretation, constitutionalism, taxation, naturalization of citizens).
    • SS 12.1.1.d Analyze and evaluate the foundation, structures, and functions of local government (e.g., city council, school board, county government, regional boards).
    • SS 12.1.1.e Analyze and evaluate the foundation, structures, and functions of state government (e.g., bicameral/unicameral, reapportionment/redistricting, branches of government).
    • SS 12.1.1.f Analyze and evaluate the foundation, structures, and functions of supranational organizations (e.g., United Nations, NATO, European Union, treaties, trade organizations).
    • SS 12.1.1.g Analyze and evaluate the roles that political parties have played in the United States.
    • SS 12.1.1.h Analyze and evaluate United States foreign policy issues (e.g. methods, approaches, events).
  • SS 12.1.2 Students will address local, state, national or international issues and policies through meaningful civic participation.
    • SS 12.1.2.a Evaluate how individuals and groups can effectively use the structure and functions of various levels of government to shape policy (e.g., lobbying, voting, contacting government officials, petitioning).
    • SS 12.1.2.b Analyze the significance and benefits of patriotic symbols, songs, holidays, and activities (e.g. Pledge of Allegiance, “The Star Spangled Banner”, “America”, Veteran’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, American Indian Day, Constitution Day).
    • SS 12.1.2.c Engage in civic activities (e.g., discussing current issues, advocating for personal rights and the rights of others, influencing governmental actions, participating in civil discourse, registering for selective service, participating in community improvement activities, service learning).
    • SS 12.1.2.d Analyze an issue and determine which level of government is most appropriate to utilize in addressing the issue.
    • SS 12.1.2.e Describe the roles and influences of individuals, groups, and the media as checks on governmental practices (e.g., interest groups, political action committees, lobbyists, public opinion polls).
    • SS 12.1.2.f Critique various media sources for accuracy and perspective.
  • SS 12.4.2 (US) Students will analyze and evaluate the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols upon US history using multiple types of sources.
    • SS 12.4.2.a (US) Analyze and evaluate the impact of people, events, ideas, and symbols, including various cultures and ethnic groups, on history in the United States (e.g., unique nature of the creation and organization of the American Government, the United States as an exceptional nation based upon personal freedom, the inherent nature of citizens’ rights, and democratic ideals; Progressive Era: Teddy Roosevelt, The Jungle, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, suffrage; World War I: Woodrow Wilson, League of Nations, Harlem Renaissance, Jazz, Prohibition, The Depression: Franklin Delano Roosevelt; World War II: Dwight Eisenhower, internment camps, Holocaust; Cold War: Marshall Plan, John F. Kennedy, Eleanor Roosevelt, Korea, Vietnam, Ronald Reagan; Civil Rights Era: Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, NAACP, AIM, Cesar Chavez, Supreme Court decisions such as Brown v. Board of Education, key legislation; Contemporary United States: patriotism, Watergate, Sandra Day O’Connor, Clarence Thomas, fall of the Berlin Wall, Colin Powell, 9/11, Steve Jobs, Bill Gates).
    • SS 12.4.2.b (US) Analyze and evaluate how the United States has changed over the course of time, using maps, documents, and other artifacts.
    • SS 12.4.2.c (US) Analyze and evaluate the appropriate uses of primary and secondary sources.