New Hampshire

New Hampshire Citizenship Education Policies:

N.H. Code Admin. R. Ann. Chapter Ed 306.27m: 20 credits required for graduation include: one credit in United States and New Hampshire history, one-half credit in United States and New Hampshire government/civics, one-half credit in world history, global studies or geography.

New Hampshire Social Studies Framework

Standards are contained in the K-12 Social Studies Curriculum Framework, organized around five content strands, which include curriculum standards. Strands are Civics and Government, Economics, Geography, New Hampshire and United States History, and World History and Contemporary Issues.

The K-12 Social Studies Curriculum Framework is organized in three parts: themes, essential skills and content strands. Ten themes “serve as a way of finding meaningful ways of addressing the standards and expectations and, perhaps more importantly, as a way of using the frameworks to encourage higher-order thinking.” Examples of themes are Civic Ideals, Practices and Engagement; Individualism, Equality and Authority; and Patterns of Social and Political Interaction. Essential skills foster critical thinking and decision-making. Content strands include a statement of purpose, several curriculum standards and suggested grade level expectations for grades 2, 4, 6, 8 and 12.

Kindergarten-Grade 2

  • SS:CV:1: The Nature and Purpose of Government: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of governments, and the fundamental ideals of government of the United States.
    • SS:CV:2:1.1: Compare the rules to the classroom and school to the rules of the United States system of government. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)
    • SS:CV:2:1.2: Identify documents and symbols that embody the core ideals of the United States Government, e.g., the bald eagle, the Pledge of Allegiance. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, J: Human Expression and Communication)
    • SS:CV:2:1.3: Identify the basic purposes of state and national government. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement)
    • SS:CV:2:1.4: Evaluate the effectiveness and fairness of rules and laws at the school level. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)
  • SS:CV:2: Structure and Function of United States and New Hampshire Government: Students will demonstrate an understanding of major provisions of the United States and New Hampshire Constitutions, and the organization and operation of government at all levels including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.
    • SS:CV:2:2.1: Explain how public officials are chosen. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement)
  • SS:CV:4: Rights and Responsibilities: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and the ability to apply their knowledge of local, state, and national government through the political process and citizen involvement.
    • SS:CV:2:4.1: Examine the responsibilities of individuals as members of a family, school and community, e.g., community helpers or chores at home and school. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, C: People, Places and Environment)
    • SS:CV:2:4.2: Discuss ways individuals can be involved in their community, e.g., food drive or cleaning school grounds. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement)

Grades 3-4

  • SS:CV:1: The Nature and Purpose of Government: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of governments, and the fundamental ideals of government of the United States.
    • SS:CV:4:1.1: Explain the ideal of the United States system of government, e.g., equal rights or tolerance for others. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, C: People, Places and Environment)
    • SS:CV:4:1.2: Analyze how government addresses social, political, and geographic issues. e.g., local land use decisions or decisions involving human rights. (Themes: 1: Conflict and Cooperation, B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, C: People, Places and Environment)
  • SS:CV:2: Structure and Function of United States and New Hampshire Government: Students will demonstrate an understanding of major provisions of the United States and New Hampshire Constitutions, and the organization and operation of government at all levels including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.
    • SS:CV:4:2.1: Identify the individual functions of the three branches of government and the organization of New Hampshire state government. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement)
    • SS:CV:4:2.2: Explain how laws and/or policies are made at local and state levels. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)
  • SS:CV:4: Rights and Responsibilities: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and the ability to apply their knowledge of local, state, and national government through the political process and citizen involvement.
    • SS:CV:4:4.1: Describe the rights of citizens as outlined by the Constitutions of New Hampshire and the United States. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)

Grades 5-6

  • SS:CV:1: The Nature and Purpose of Government: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of governments, and the fundamental ideals of the government of the United States.
    • SS:CV:6:1.1: Apply the ideals and principles of the American system of government to historic and contemporary examples, e.g., individual rights and responsibilities, minority rights, or equality of opportunity and equal protection under the law. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)
    • SS:CV:6:1.2: Identify the core ideals and principles of American government by citing documents, e.g., the Declaration of Independence, the United States Constitution, or the Bill of Rights. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority, J: Human Expression and Communication)
    • SS:CV:6:1.3: Apply criteria for evaluating the effectiveness and fairness of rules and laws at the local, state, or federal levels. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)
    • SS:CV:6:1.4: Differentiate among the major forms of limited and unlimited governments, e.g., monarchy, oligarchy, or democracy. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, F: Global Transformation, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)
  • SS:CV:2: Structure and Function of United States and New Hampshire Government: Students will demonstrate an understanding of major provisions of the United States and New Hampshire Constitutions, and the organization and operation of government at all levels including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.
    • SS:CV:6:2.1: Illustrate ways in which government in the United States is founded on the conviction that Americans are united by the principles they share, e.g., life, liberty, and property. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, J: Human Expression and Communication)
    • SS:CV:6:2.2: Identify and illustrate the heritage that early settlers brought to the development and establishment of American democracy, e.g., political, legal, philosophical, or religious traditions. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)
  • SS:HI:1: Political Foundations and Development: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the major ideas, issues and events pertaining to the history of governance in our state and nation.
    • SS:HI:6:1.1: Explain how and why people have developed forms of self-government, e.g., the Mayflower Compact or the Iroquois League. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)
  • SS:HI:6:1.2: Explain how the foundations of American democracy are rooted in European, Native American and colonial traditions, experiences and institutions. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)
  • SS:CV:1: The Nature and Purpose of Government: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of governments, and the fundamental ideals of government of the United States.
    • SS:CV:8:1.1: Explain why limiting the powers of government is essential for the protection of individual rights. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)

Grades 7-8

  • SS:CV:8:1.2: Analyze the major arguments for and against representative government as distinguished from direct democracy, and discuss how, in a representative democracy, minority rights are protected. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)
  • SS:CV:2: Structure and Function of United States and New Hampshire Government: Students will demonstrate an understanding of major provisions of the United States and New Hampshire Constitutions, and the organization and operation of government at all levels including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.
    • SS:CV:8:2.1: Define the organization and responsibilities of federal government that are set forth in the New Hampshire Constitution, the United States Constitution and their amendments, e.g., Separation of Powers, Division of Powers, or the Bill of Rights. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement)
    • SS:CV:8:2.2: Compare and contrast the structure and major responsibilities and services of government at the local, state, and federal levels as set forth in the New Hampshire Constitution and the United States Constitution, e.g., taxation, transportation, or education. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement)
    • SS:CV:8:2.3: Describe ways in which particular events and documents contributed to the evolution of American government, e.g., states’ rights, universal suffrage, or civil rights. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)
    • SS:CV:8:2.4: Explain the legislative and political processes by which a bill becomes a law or government policy is established at the local, state, and federal levels, e.g., citizen petitions or conference committees. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)
  • SS:HI:1: Political Foundations and Development: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the major ideas, issues and events pertaining to the history of governance in our state and nation.
    • SS:HI:8:1.1: Examine how suffrage expanded to various groups of citizens, e.g., women African-Americans. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)
    • SS:HI:8:1.2: Describe the role New Hampshire voters have played in our nation’s presidential primaries and elections. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)
    • SS:HI:8:1.3: Examine how religion has influenced the political life of the nation, e.g., the Know Nothing Party, the temperance movement, or the First Great Awakening. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, J: Human Expression and Communication)
    • SS:HI:8:1.4: Analyze the tension between states’ rights and national authority, e.g., the nullification crisis of 1832 or school integration of the 1960’s. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)

Grades 9-12

  • SS:CV:1: The Nature and Purpose of Government: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the nature of governments, and the fundamental ideals of government of the United States.
    • SS:CV:12:1.1: Identify the structures and functions of government at various levels, e.g., county—role of the sheriff’s office, or nation—role of providing the defense of the country. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement)
    • SS:CV:12:1.2: Examine how institutions and individuals make, apply, and enforce rules and laws, e.g., the Federal Communications Commission regulations on television broadcast standards or local public hearings on zoning regulations. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)
    • SS:CV:12:1.3: Evaluate how the purposes of government have been interpreted , e.g., promoting the general welfare or protection of private property. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, D: Material Wants and Needs)
    • SS:CV:12:1.4: Explain how in the United States legitimate authority derives from custom, law and consent of the governed, e.g., the Mayflower Compact or local curfews. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority)
  • SS:CV:2: Structure and Function of United States and New Hampshire Government: Students will demonstrate an understanding of major provisions of the United States and New Hampshire Constitutions, and the organization and operation of government at all levels including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.
    • SS:CV:12:2.1: Describe how the fundamental ideals and principles of American government are incorporated in the United States Constitution and the New Hampshire Constitution, e.g., the rule of law or individual rights and responsibilities. (Themes: H: Individualism, Equality and Authority, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction, J: Human Expression and Communication)
    • SS:CV:12:2.2: Analyze the evolution of the United States Constitution as a living document, e.g., the Bill of Rights or Plessy v. Ferguson. (Themes: E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, H: Individualism, Equality and Authority, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)
    • SS:CV:12:2.3: Describe the roles and responsibilities of the United States and New Hampshire judicial systems, e.g., resolution of conflict between states or New Hampshire Legislature’s use of advisory opinions from the New Hampshire Supreme Court. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change)
    • SS:CV:12:2.4: Evaluate how individual rights have been extended in the United States, e.g., Truman’s integration of the Armed Services or the Miranda decision. (Themes: H: Individualism, Equality and Authority, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)
  • SS:HI:1: Political Foundations and Development: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the major ideas, issues and events pertaining to the history of governance in our state and nation.
    • SS:HI:12:1.1: Account for the rise and fall of political parties and movements and their impact, e.g., the
    • Whig Party or the Progressive Movement. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)
    • SS:HI:12:1.2: Analyze how religion has influenced the political life of the nation, e.g., the separation of church and state in early New Hampshire or the rise of the Moral Majority. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, J: Human Expression and Communication)
    • SS:HI:12:1.3: Analyze the roots and application of the federal system of government by examining key documents and events, e.g., the Articles of Confederation or the New Deal. (Themes: B: Civic Ideals, Practices, and Engagement)
    • SS:HI:12:1.4: Examine the impact of sectionalism on national crises and United States government policies, e.g., Hartford Convention or Brown v. Board of Education. (Themes: A: Conflict and Cooperation, E: Cultural Development, Interaction, and Change, I: Patterns of Social and Political Interaction)