Oklahoma

Oklahoma State Department of Education Codified Rules, Title 210, Chapter 15, Subchapter 3, Part 11:

OAC §210:15-3 Social studies standards and curriculum guidelines are detailed in Oklahoma Administrative Code.

Priority Academic Student Skills, Social Studies:

The Core Content Area of Civics, Economics, and Government “give students a basic understanding of civic life, politics, and government. They help students understand the workings of their political system and that of others, as well as the relationship of American politics and government to world affairs. The goal of civics and government is to develop informed, competent, and responsible citizens who are politically aware and active and committed to the fundamental values and principles of American constitutional democracy.” (page 217)

Oklahoma Social Studies Standards

Grade PK & K

  • Citizenship Literacy Content Standard 1: The student will exhibit traits of good citizenship.
    • Recognize the importance of rules and responsibilities as a member of the family, class, and school.
  • History Literacy Content Standard 4: The student will understand that history relates to events and people of other times and places.
    • Recognize that commemorative holidays honor people and events of the past including Columbus Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, Washington’s Birthday, and Independence Day.
    • Identify important American symbols and explain their meanings including United States Flag and the Bald Eagle, the Statue of Liberty, and the Liberty Bell.
    • Identify the United States Flag as a symbol of the country including the learning of the Pledge of Allegiance and practicing appropriate flag etiquette.

Grade 1

  • Citizenship Literacy Content Standard 1: The student will analyze his/her role as a citizen in a community.
    • Identify the main purpose of government, its rules and laws including the concept of consequences for one’s actions when a law or rule is violated.
    • Participate in patriotic traditions including the recitation of The Pledge of Allegiance, the singing of My Country ‘Tis of Thee, and demonstration of appropriate flag etiquette and proper behavior during the playing of the national anthem.
    • Identify important American symbols and explain their meanings including United States Flag, the Bald Eagle, the Statue of Liberty, and the Liberty Bell.
    • Describe how historic figures display character traits of fairness, respect for others, stewardship of natural resources, courage, equality, hard work, self-discipline, and commitment to the common good.
    • Describe relationships between people and events of the past which are commemorated on Columbus Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Washington’s Birthday, Lincoln’s Birthday, Flag Day, and Independence Day.
  • History Literacy Content Standard 4: The student will examine important events and historic figures in the nation’s past.
    • Participate in shared research using biographies and informational text the contributions of historic figures in American history including Squanto, the Pilgrims, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Paul Revere, Thomas Jefferson, Meriwether Lewis, William Clark, Sacagawea, Daniel Boone, Abraham Lincoln, and George Washington Carver.
    • Identify the significance of historic places and monuments and describe their connection to real events of the past including the Plymouth Plantation, Mount Vernon, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial.
    • Commemorate the contributions to the American nation of significant groups including National Hispanic History Month, Native American Heritage Month, and Black History Month.

Grade 2

  • Citizenship Literacy Content Standard 1: The student will explain the importance of the basic principles that provide the foundation of the American system of government.
    • Summarize the five key individual rights and liberties protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.
    • Identify the basic roles of national leaders including the President of the United States and the members of the United States Congress.
    • Identify important American symbols and explain their meanings including United States Flag, the Bald Eagle, the Statue of Liberty, Lady Justice, and the Liberty Bell.
    • Participate in patriotic traditions including the recitation of The Pledge of Allegiance and singing of The Star Spangled Banner, and demonstrate proper flag etiquette and appropriate behavior during both.
    • Describe relationships between people and events of the past which are commemorated on Columbus Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Washington’s Birthday, Lincoln’s Birthday, Flag Day, and Independence Day.
  • History Literacy Content Standard 4: The student will examine the lives of notable Americans who expanded people’s rights and freedoms in the American system of government.
    • Participate in shared and individual research using biographies and informational text historic examples of honesty, courage, patriotism, self-sacrifice, and other admirable character traits seen in citizens and leaders including Abigail Adams, Francis Scott Key, Harriet Tubman, Abraham Lincoln, Chief Joseph, Eleanor Roosevelt, Fred Korematsu, Jackie Robinson, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, César Chávez, and Senator Daniel Inouye.
    • Analyze the significance of historic places including the White House, the United States Capitol, the United States Supreme Court, the Washington Monument, and the Lincoln Memorial.
    • Commemorate months designated to the contributions the American nation of significant groups to the history of including National Hispanic History Month, Native American Heritage Month, Black History Month, Women’s History Month, and Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month.

Grade 3

  • Citizenship Literacy Content Standard 1: The student will analyze the traits of good citizens.
    • Commemorate Celebrate Freedom Work by recognizing the sacrifices and contributions of American freedom by veterans and by reciting the social contract selection from the Declaration of Independence.
    • Describe relationships between people and events of the past which are commemorated on Columbus Day, Veterans Day, Thanksgiving Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Washington’s Birthday, Lincoln’s Birthday, Flag Day, and Independence Day.

Grade 4

  • Content Standard 1: Student will analyze the physical, cultural, political, economic, and the historic features and places of the regions of the United States.
    • Identify the historic significance of major national monuments, historic sites, and landmarks including the Jefferson, Lincoln, and Washington Monuments, the White House, the United States Capitol, the United States Supreme Court, Mount Vernon, Monticello, Colonial Williamsburg, Jamestown Historic Site, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site in Atlanta, Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty, the 9/11 memorials, Independence Hall, the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial/Gateway Arch in St. Louis, the Oklahoma City National Memorial, Mount Rushmore, Little Bighorn National Monument, the Golden Gate Bridge, and Pearl Harbor National Park.
    • Describe the purpose of local, state, tribal, and national governments in meeting the needs of American citizens including the basic structure of the national government centered in Washington, D.C.
    • Commemorate Celebrate Freedom Week by recognizing the sacrifices and contributions to American freedom by veterans and by reciting the social contract selection from the Declaration of Independence.

Grade 5

  • Content Standard 1: The student will examine James Towne Settlement and Plimoth Plantation as the foundations of American culture and society.
    • Examine the economic and political reasons and motivations for English exploration and settlement in Virginia as evidenced through the competition for resources and the gaining of national wealth and prestige at Roanoke and James Towne.
    • Analyze the economic, political, and religious reasons and motivations of free immigrants and indentured servants from the British Isles who came to Virginia.
    • Identify and explain the reasons for the English commitment to the permanent settlement of James Towne as evidenced through the foundational events of 1619 including the introduction of
      • representative government with the meeting of the House of Burgesses,
      • private ownership of land, and
      • Africans as laborers; initially as indentured servants and later lifetime slavery.
    • Use specific textual evidence from primary and secondary sources to summarize the successes and challenges the settlement of Plimoth Plantation experienced in regards to their approach to
      • Religious motivations for migration,
      • Governing institutions as established by the Mayflower Compact,
      • Relationship with Native Americans, and
      • The contributions of the Pilgrims, William Bradford, Chief Massasoit, and Squanto.
  • Content Standard 2: The student will compare and contrast the developments of the New England Colonies, the Middle Colonies, and the Southern Colonies based on economic opportunities, natural resources, settlement patterns, culture, and institutions of self-government.
    • Compare and contrast the three colonial regions in regards to natural resources, agriculture, exports, and economic growth including the different uses of the labor systems use of indentured servants and slaves.
    • Analyze the similarities and differences of self-government in the three colonial regions including the role of religion in the establishment of some colonies, the House of Burgesses in Virginia, and town hall meetings in New England.
    • Explain the international economic and cultural interactions occurring because of the triangular trade routes including the forced migration of Africans in the Middle Passage to the British colonies.
    • Analyze and explain the relationships and interactions of ongoing encounters and conflicts between Native Americans and the British colonists involving territorial claims including King Phillip’s War.
    • Draw specific evidence using informational texts and analyze the contributions of important individuals and groups to the foundation of the American system including Roger Williams, the Puritans, William Penn and the Quakers, Lord Baltimore, and James Oglethorpe.
  • Content Standard 3: The student will examine the foundations of the American nation laid during the Revolutionary Era through the contributions of historic individuals and groups, the spreading of the ideals found within the Declaration of Independence, and the significant military and diplomatic events of the Revolutionary War that resulted in an independent United States.
    • Research and examine the causes and effects of significant events leading to armed conflict between the colonies and Great Britain drawing evidence from informational texts about the following events including
      • The Proclamation of 1763 by King George III in restricting the perceived rights of the colonists to Native American lands which they believed they had earned by fighting during the French and Indian War,
      • The Sugar and Stamp Acts as the first direct taxes levied by Parliament on the American colonists,
      • The boycotts of British goods and the efforts of the Committees of Correspondence as economic means of protesting British policies the colonists thought were violating their rights to govern themselves including the right of self-taxation in hopes of getting the acts repealed,
      • The Quartering Act as a way for the British government to share the costs of defending the colonies and of controlling the growing colonial discontent,
      • The Boston Massacre as a sign the colonists were beginning to change protest tactics from peaceful means to direct, physical confrontation,
      • Colonial arguments that there should be no taxation without representation in Parliament,
      • The Boston Tea Party and issuance of the Coercive Acts (the Intolerable Acts) as punishment for destroying private property,
      • The British raids on Lexington and Concord, which provoked colonial armed resistance resulting in the siege of the British in Boston, and
      • The publication of Thomas Paine’s pamphlet, Common Sense, which made a rational argument for colonial independence.
    • Draw evidence from the Declaration of Independence to identify and explain the colonial grievances which motivated the Second Continental Congress to make arguments for and to declare independence from Great Britain and establish the ideals in American society of equality, inalienable rights, and the consent of the governed.
    • Commemorate Celebrate Freedom Week by recognizing the sacrifices and contributions to American freedom by veterans and by reciting the social contract selection from the Declaration of Independence.
    • Draw specific evidence from informational texts and analyze the formation, benefits, and weaknesses of the first American national system of government under the Articles of Confederation including conducting and winning the Revolutionary War and management of the western territories.
    • Identify and explain the contributions and points of view of key individuals and groups involved in the American Revolution including Patrick Henry, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Abigail Adams, Paul Revere, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Mercy Otis Warren, Phillis Wheatley, the Sons and Daughters of Liberty, patriots, and loyalists by drawing information from multiple sources.
  • Content Standard 4: The student will examine the formation of the American system of government following the American Revolution
    • Draw specific evidence from informational texts and examine the issues and events encountered by the young nation that led to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787 including a weak national government, the Northwest Ordinance, and civil unrest as typified in Shays’ Rebellion.
    • Examine the contributions and leadership of George Washington, James Madison, George Mason, and Gouverneur Morris as evidenced in the great issues, debates, and compromises of the Constitutional Convention including the Virginia Plan and the New Jersey Plan, slavery, the Three-fifths Compromise, and the Great Compromise.
    • Determine the main purposes of the United States government as expressed in the Preamble and as evidenced in the United States Constitution including the principles reflected in the separation of powers, checks and balances, and shared powers between the federal and state governments, and the basic responsibilities of the three branches of government.
    • Explain the process of ratification of the United States Constitution as well as compare and contrast the viewpoints of the Federalists and Anti-Federalists over the addition of a bill of rights.
    • Examine the Bill of Rights and summarize the liberties protected in all 10 amendments.
  • Content Standard 5: The student will compare and contrast the continued formation of the new nation under the leadership of Presidents Washington, Adams, and Jefferson.
    • Analyze the formation of the new government and the presidential leadership qualities of George Washington including the precedent set by his decision not to seek a third term and the impact of his Farewell Address.
    • Explain the impact of the presidential election of 1800 regarding the peaceful transfer of political power from one party to another.
    • Examine the transformative impact of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803 upon the American system in regards to the explorations by Lewis and Clark and the concept of Manifest Destiny as America expanded westward.

Grade 6

  • Content Standard 4: The student will analyze the human systems of the Western Hemisphere in the context of the world’s peoples and cultures.
    • Describe the major political systems of representative governments (democracy, republic, constitutional monarchy) and authoritarian systems (dictatorship) including the role of the citizen in the selection of government officials, lawmaking, and the liberties guaranteed under different forms of government.

Grade 7

  • Content Standard 1: The student will analyze data from a geographic perspective using the skills and tools of geography.
    • Commemorate Celebrate Freedom Week by recognizing the sacrificed and contributions to American freedom by veterans and by reciting the social contract selection from the Declaration of Independence.
  • Content Standard 4: The student will analyze the world’s peoples and cultures in the context of the human systems in the Eastern Hemisphere.
    • Compare and contrast the major political systems of representative governments (democracy, republic, and constitutional monarchy) and authoritarian systems (dictatorship and absolute monarchy) including the role of the citizen in the selection of government officials, lawmaking, and the liberties guaranteed under different forms of government.
      • The symbolic role of the British crown in comparison to the absolute authority of the monarchy of Saudi Arabia.
      • The transformation of the former Soviet Union from an authoritarian system to the limited representative democracy of Russia.

Grade 8

  • Content Standard 1: The student will analyze the foundations of the United States by examining the causes, events, and ideologies which led to the American Revolution.
    • Summarize the political and economic consequences of the French and Indian War on the 13 colonies including the imperial policies of requiring the colonies to pay a share of the costs of defending the British Empire and the precedent of the Albany Plan of Union as an early attempt to unify the colonies.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to summarize the significance of British attempts to regulate colonial rights, as well as the colonial responses to these measures including
      • The restriction of colonial rights as British subjects including colonial opposition and protests against taxation without representation, the boycotts of British goods, Patrick Henry’s Stamp Act Resolves, the Committees of Correspondence, and the Boston Massacre,
      • The Coercive Acts of 1774 (the Intolerable Acts) as British punishment for the Boston Tea Party and the convening of the First Continental Congress as a colonial response,
      • The Battles of Lexington and Concord as a rallying point of armed colonial resistance, and
      • Patrick Henry’s Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death speech and Thomas Paine’s pamphlet Common Sense advocating the defense of colonial rights and independence.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to analyze the ideological and propaganda war between Great Britain and her North American colonies including the
      • Points of views of the Patriots and the Loyalists about independence,
      • Writings of Mercy Otis Warren and Phillis Wheatley,
      • Use of Paul Revere’s engraving of the Boston Massacre,
      • Rejection of the Olive Branch Petition by King George III, and
      • Grievances which motivated the Second Continental Congress to make arguments for and to declare independence from Great Britain thus creating the United States of America.
    • Determine the central ideas and grievances expressed in the Declaration of Independence and their intellectual origin including
      • John Locke’s theory of natural rights,
      • The concept of the social contract,
      • The ideals established in the American society of equality, inalienable rights, and the consent of the governed, and
      • Evaluate the contributions of Thomas Jefferson and the Committee of Five in drafting the Declaration of Independence.
    • Commemorate Celebrate Freedom Week by recognizing the sacrifices and contributions to American freedom by veterans and by reciting the social contract selection from the Declaration of Independence.
  • Content Standard 2: The student will examine the foundations of the American nation laid during the Revolutionary Era through the contributions of significant individuals and groups involved in the key military and diplomatic events of the Revolutionary War that resulted in an independent nation.
    • Analyze the formation of the first American national system of government under the Articles of Confederation including the success of conducting and winning the Revolutionary War.
    • Compare and contrast the different motivations and choices that various colonial populations had regarding the War for Independence including
      • Whether to fight for independence, remain loyal to the king, or to be neutral,
      • The choices that free and enslaved African Americans had of escaping to freedom, or joining the British or Colonial forces, or remaining enslaved, and
      • The decisions Native Americans had as to which side to support in hopes of protecting their traditional cultures and native territories.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to summarize the impact of key military and diplomatic events including the
      • Military leadership of General George Washington,
      • Victories at Boston, Trenton, and Saratoga,
      • French Alliance,
      • Publication of Thomas Paine’s The Crisis,
      • Valley Forge Encampment, and
      • Defeat of Lord Cornwallis’s army at the Siege of Yorktown.
  • Content Standard 3: The student will examine the formation of the American system of government following the Revolutionary War that led to the creation of the United States Constitution.
    • Examine and summarize the issues encountered by the young nation that led to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787 including the
      • Strengths and weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation,
      • Lack of a common national currency,
      • Lack of a common defense,
      • Management of the war debts,
      • Disputes over the western territories as resolved by the Northwest Ordinance, and
      • Civil unrest as typified in Shays’ Rebellion.
    • Analyze the significance of the Constitutional Convention, its major debates and compromises including the Virginia Plan, the New Jersey Plan, the Great Compromise, the Three-fifths Compromise, and the key contributions of George Washington, James Madison, George Mason, and Gouverneur Morris.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to examine the arguments for and against the ratification of the United States Constitution as expressed in the Federalist Papers Number 10 and Number 51, as well as Anti-Federalist concerns over a strong central government and the omission of a bill of rights.
    • Explain the constitutional principles of popular sovereignty, consent of the governed, separation of powers, checks and balances, federalism, and judicial review.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence and summarize the rights and responsibilities all Americans possess under the United States Constitution as guaranteed in the Bill of Rights including the freedoms of religion, speech, press, assembly, petition, and the rights to due process and trial by jury.
  • Content Standard 4: The student will examine the political, economic, social, and geographic transformation of the United States during the early to mid-1800s.
    • Analyze the impact and consequences of major events and issues facing early presidential administrations including
      • The suppression of the Whiskey Rebellion and establishment of the government’s right to tax,
      • President George Washington’s advice for the new nation in his Farewell Address,
      • The restriction of individual rights in the Alien and Sedition Acts and the responses of the RepublicanDemocrats in the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions,
      • The impact of the presidential election of 1800 and the peaceful transfer of political power from one party to another,
      • The acquisition of territory through the Louisiana Purchase and the contributions of the explorations of the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery Expedition,
      • How the Marshall Court’s precedent-setting decisions in Marbury v. Madison and McCulloch v. Maryland interpreted the United States Constitution and established the Supreme Court as an independent and equal branch of the federal government.
      • The War of 1812 which confirmed American independence and fueled a spirit of nationalism,
      • The increased sectional tensions as the nation dealt with the expansion of slavery and attempts to limit it through the Missouri Compromise, and
      • The Monroe Doctrine as an attempt to protect American interests and territory in the western hemisphere.
    • Summarize the significance and impact of the Jacksonian Era including the
      • Election of Andrew Jackson as a victory for the common man,
      • Nullification Crisis and the development of the states’ rights debates as typified by the arguments put forth by Senator Daniel Webster and Senator John C. Calhoun, and
      • Impact of government policies, non-adherence to treaties, and territorial expansion on Native American lands including the resistance and removal of the Five Tribes.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare the sectional economic transformations including the concentration of population, manufacturing, shipping, and the development of the railroad system in the North as contrasted to the plantation system, the increased demand for cotton brought about by the invention of the cotton gin, and the reliance on a slave labor system in the South.
    • Analyze points of view from specific textual evidence to describe the variety of African American experiences, both slave and free, including Nat Turner’s Rebellion, legal restrictions in the South, and efforts to escape via the Underground Railroad network including Harriet Tubman.
    • Analyze and summarize the significance of the Abolitionist and Women’s Suffrage Movements including the influence of the Second Great Awakening and the Declaration of Sentiments, and the leadership of Frederick Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison, Sojourner Truth, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to the respective movements.
    • Examine the concept of Manifest Destiny as a motivation and justification for westward expansion, including the
      • Territorial growth resulting from the annexation of Texas, the Mexican Cession, and the Gadsden Purchase,
      • Causes of the rapid settlement of Oregon and California,
      • Impact upon Native American culture and tribal lands, and
      • Growing sectional tensions regarding the expansion of slavery.
  • Content Standard 5: The student will analyze the social and political transformation of the United States as a result of the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War during the period of 1850 to 1865.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to summarize the importance of slavery as a principal cause of increased sectional polarization as seen in the following significant events including the
      • Compromise of 1850 as a last attempt to reach a compromise regarding slavery,
      • Publication of Uncle Tom’s Cabin as fuel for anti-slavery sentiments,
      • Kansas-Nebraska Act as it established the principle of popular sovereignty in new territories, repealed the Missouri Compromise, and led to factional feuds in Bleeding Kansas, and
      • Dred Scott v. Sanford case which declared slaves as property and motivated John Brown’s Raid on the federal arsenal at Harper’s Ferry.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to analyze the significance and results of the presidential election of 1860 including the
      • Secession of South Carolina as expressed in the Ordinance of Secession,
      • Goal of President Abraham Lincoln to preserve the Union,
      • Formation of the Confederate States of America,
      • Opening attack on Fort Sumter, and
      • Rising tensions over the strategic Border States.
    • Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the Union and the Confederacy upon the eve of the war including the political/military leadership of President Lincoln to Confederate President Jefferson Davis and the military leadership of Union General Ulysses S. Grant to Confederate General Robert E. Lee.
    • Identify and summarize the consequences of the major turning points of the war including the
      • Anaconda Plan and Total War Strategy,
      • Battle of Antietam as a catalyst for the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation and its role in expanding the goals of the war to include the ending of slavery,
      • Battle of Gettysburg as inspiration for the Gettysburg Address and how Lincoln’s speech clarified the Union’s motivations for winning the war,
      • Capture of Vicksburg in securing the Union’s control of the Mississippi River,
      • Excerpts from Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address of President Lincoln, calling for national reconciliation,
      • Generosity of the North in terms of surrender demands as offered to General Lee at Appomattox Courthouse, and
      • Impact of Lincoln’s assassination and loss of his leadership on plans for reconstruction.
  • Content Standard 6: The student will analyze the transformation of politics and society during the Reconstruction Era, 1865 to 1877.
    • Compare and contrast the various policies and plans for the reconstruction of the Confederacy including those proposed by President Lincoln, President Andrew Johnson, and the Radical Republicans.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to analyze the impact of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments, the Black Codes, the Freedmen’s Bureau, and Jim Crow laws.
    • Identify points of view regarding the social changes following the Civil War including the role of carpetbaggers and scalawags, the rise of the Ku Klux Klan, elected Black officials, and sharecroppers.
    • Evaluate the impact of the Homestead Act of 1862 and the resulting movement westward to free land including the impact of continued displacement of Native Americans.
    • Assess the impact of the presidential election of 1876 as an end to the reconstruction of the South.

High School United States Government

  • Content Standard 1: The student will compare the formation of contemporary governments in terms of access, use, and justification of power.
    • Contrast the essential characteristics of limited versus unlimited governments with an understanding that the United States’ constitutional system establishes legal restraints on governmental power.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast historic and contemporary examples of unlimited governments, known as authoritarian or totalitarian systems including dictatorships, theocracies, and absolute monarchies to examples of limited systems including direct democracies, representative democracies, constitutional monarchies, and republics.
    • Summarize and explain how the American system is a representative republic in which the citizenry is sovereign.
    • Compare the advantages and disadvantages of the major ways governmental power is distributed, shared, and structured in unitary, federal, and confederal systems in terms of effectiveness, prevention of abuse of power, and responsiveness to the popular will.
    • Compare and contrast the property and due process rights in the United States free-market economy which are protected by the United States Constitution to the restricted property and due process rights existing/nonexisting under command economic systems.
  • Content Standard 2: The student will describe the historic and philosophical foundations of the United States republican system of government.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view to examine the philosophical contributions of the Enlightenment including the writings of Montesquieu, Locke, and Thomas Jefferson; the early experiences of colonial self-government; and the influence of religious texts including The Bible to the foundation of American political thought.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence and summarize the impact of major historic events of the Revolutionary Era and major documents contributing to the formation of constitutional government in the United States including the Mayflower Compact (1620), the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut (1639), the English Bill of Rights (1689), the Albany Plan of Union (1754), the Virginia Declaration of Rights (1776), the Articles of Confederation (1781), and the colonial/revolutionary writings of Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, and James Otis.
    • Determine the central ideas and importance of the concept of inalienable rights, the social contract or compact, the 27 grievances as stated in the Declaration of Independence, and the discussions of enumerated versus implied powers; and cite specific textual and visual evidence to explain how the protection of these rights were incorporated in the United States Constitution and the federal Bill of Rights as a fundamental purpose of the government.
    • Evaluate the necessity for a written constitution to set forth the organization of government and to distribute powers among the three different branches of government and the states, or the people.
    • Analyze the events and major conflicts, beliefs, and arguments which led to the addition of the Bill of Rights to the United States Constitution; and compare the points of view as expressed in Federalist Papers Number 10 and Number 51 and the writings of the Anti-Federalists including Patrick Henry and George Mason. Analyze the steps of the constitutional amendment process including examples of recent attempts to amend the United States Constitution as exemplified in the issues of the Equal Rights Amendment and flag desecration.
  • Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the fundamental principles of the American system of government.
    • Explain the concept of popular sovereignty as exercised by the nation’s people who possess the ultimate source of authority.
    • Examine the American system of federalism and evaluate the changes that have occurred in the relationship between the states and the national government over time.
    • Analyze the enumerated powers delegated to the federal government by the states in the United States Constitution, the limits placed on the powers of the national government, and the powers of the states including the reserved and concurrent powers.
    • Summarize and explain the relationships and the responsibilities between national and state governments including tribal and local governments.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence and summarize how power is separated as well as shared under the American system including the separation of powers and checks and balance, which is designed to prevent abuse of power by any government body at the local, state, tribal, and federal levels.
    • Evaluate the importance of the rule of law and on the sources, purposes, and functions of government, and explain how the rule of law provides for the protection of individual liberties, public order, management of conflict, and assurance of domestic and national security.
    • Analyze the United States government’s responsibility to protect minority rights while legitimizing majority rule including the rights of due process and equality under the law.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence and compare points of view regarding the shared values and ideals of American political culture as set forth in basic documents and speeches including the Declaration of Sentiments, Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, Franklin Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter From Birmingham Jail.
  • Content Standard 4: The student will examine the United States Constitution by comparing the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government as they form and transform American society.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to explain the purposes expressed in the Preamble and how the United States Constitution preserves those core principles of American society.
    • Examine the makeup, organization, functions, and authority exercised by the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government.
      • Identify constitutional qualifications for holding public office, the terms of office, and the expressed powers delegated to each branch of the national government including the numbers of members comprising the United States Congress and United States Supreme Court.
      • Evaluate the extent to which each branch of government reflects the people’s sovereignty including current issues concerning representation such as term limitations and legislative redistricting.
      • Describe the process in which public policy is formulated into law including both the constitutional and operational procedures utilized in the modern legislative process.
      • Explain why certain provisions of the United States Constitution result in tensions among the three branches, and evaluate how the functions of the national government have changed over time through executive actions and judicial interpretation of the necessary and proper clause.
      • Compare and contrast the structure of the national branches of government to Oklahoma’s state government.
      • Apply the principles of limited government, federalism, checks and balances, and separation of powers to the workings of the three branches of government in real world situations including current issues and events.
      • Identify the issues behind and explain the changes resulting from landmark United States Supreme Court decisions including Marbury v. Madison (1803), McCulloch v. Maryland (1819), Plessy v. Ferguson (1896), Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas (1954), Mapp v. Ohio (1961), Engel v. Vitale (1962), Miranda v. Arizona (1966), Furman v. Georgia (1972), Roe v. Wade (1973), United States v. Nixon (1974), and Bush v. Gore (2000).
    • Analyze steps of the political process and its role in the United States’ representative government.
      • Describe the electoral process including the components of national campaigns, the nominative process, campaign funding, and the Electoral College.
  • Content Standard 5: Students will be able to evaluate the significance of civic participation in order to insure the preservation of constitutional government.
    • Evaluate historic and contemporary examples of American citizens who have attempted to make the values and principles of the United States Constitution a reality.
      • Analyze the rights and liberties guaranteed to all citizens in and protected by the Bill of Rights, how they are applied and protected within the states through the 14th Amendment, and sustained through the actions of individual citizens.
      • Explain the impact on American politics, both historically and presently, of the racial, religious, socioeconomic, and ethnic diversity of American society including the importance of adhering to constitutional values in managing conflicts over diversity.

High School United States History

  • Content Standard 1: The student will analyze the transformation of the United States through its civil rights struggles, immigrant experiences, settlement of the American West, and the industrialization of American society in the Post-Reconstruction through the Progressive Eras, 1865 to 1900.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to analyze the post-Reconstruction civil rights struggles.
      • Examine the purposes and effects of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments.
      • Assess the impact of the Black Codes, Jim Crow laws, and the actions of the Ku Klux Klan.
      • Evaluate the rise and reforms of the Progressive Movement including the
    • Analyze the series of events leading to and the effects of the 16th, 17th, 18th, 19th, and 21st Amendments to the United States Constitution.
      • Assess and summarize changing race relations as exemplified in the Plessy v. Ferguson case.
      • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast early civil rights leadership including the viewpoints of Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, and Marcus Garvey in response to rising racial tensions, and the use of poll taxes and literacy tests to disenfranchise blacks and poor whites.
  • Content Standard 2: The student will analyze the expanding role of the United States in international affairs as America was transformed into a world power in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, 1890 to 1920.
    • Analyze and summarize the 1912 presidential election including the key personalities of President William Howard Taft, Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson and Eugene V. Debs; the key issues of dealing with the trusts, the right of women to vote, and trade tariffs; and the impact of the “Bull Moose Party” on the outcome of the election.
  • Content Standard 3: The student will analyze the cycles of boom and bust of the 1920s and 1930s on the transformation of American government, the economy, and society.
    • Examine the economic, political, and social transformations between the World Wars.
      • Describe the rising racial tensions in American society including the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan, increased lynchings, race riots as typified by the Tulsa Race Riot, and the use of poll taxes and literacy tests to disenfranchise blacks and poor whites.
  • Content Standard 5: The student will analyze foreign and domestic policies during the Cold War, 1945 to 1975.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to analyze the major events, personalities, tactics, and effects of the Civil Rights Movement.
      • Assess the effects of President Truman’s decision to desegregate the United States armed forces, and the legal attacks on segregation by the NAACP and Thurgood Marshall, the United States Supreme Court decisions in the cases of Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher and George McLaurin, and the differences between de jure and de facto segregation.
      • Compare and contrast segregation policies of “separate but equal,” disenfranchisement of African Americans through poll taxes, literacy tests, and violence; and the sustained attempts to dismantle segregation including the Brown v. Board of Education decision, Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the desegregation of Little Rock Central High School, the Oklahoma City lunch counter sit-ins led by Clara Luper, the Freedom Rides, the March on Washington, the Birmingham church bombing, the adoption of the 24th Amendment, the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the Selma to Montgomery marches, and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
      • Compare and contrast the view points and the contributions of civil rights leaders and organizations linking them to events of the movement including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his I Have a Dream speech, Malcolm X, NAACP, SCLC, CORE, SNCC, and the tactics used at different times including civil disobedience, non-violent resistance, sit-ins, boycotts, marches, and voter registration drives.
      • Evaluate the effects the Civil Rights Movement had on other contemporaneous social movements including the Women’s Liberation Movement, the United Farm Workers and César Chávez, and the American Indian Movement.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to analyze the ongoing social and political transformations within the United States.
      • Summarize and examine the United States Supreme Court’s use of the incorporation doctrine in applying the Bill of Rights to the states, thereby securing and further defining individual rights and civil liberties.
      • Assess the lasting impact of President Lyndon Johnson’s civil rights initiatives, the war on poverty, and the Great Society.
      • Describe the goals and effectiveness of the Native American movement on tribal identity and sovereignty including the American Indian Movement (AIM), and the Siege at Wounded Knee.
      • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to compare and contrast the changing roles of women from the Post-war Era through the 1970s including the goals of the Women’s Liberation Movement, the National Organization of Women (NOW), the attempts to ratify the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), and the United States Supreme Court’s ruling in Roe v. Wade.
      • Analyze the political and economic impact of President Nixon’s foreign policies including détente and the opening of China.
      • Evaluate the impact of the Watergate Scandal on executive powers including the role of the media, the Pentagon Papers, the first use of the 25th Amendment, and President Ford’s decision to pardon former President Nixon.
  • Content Standard 7: The student will examine contemporary challenges and successes in meeting the needs of the American citizen and society, 2002 to the present.
    • Examine the ongoing issues of immigration, employment, climate change, environmental pollution, globalization, population growth, race relations, women’s issues, healthcare, civic engagement, education, and the rapid development of technology.

High School World History

  • Content Standard 2: The student will analyze patterns of social, economic, political, and cultural changes of the Renaissance and Reformation.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to assess the significance of the Renaissance on politics and artistic creativity as exemplified by Machiavelli, Michelangelo, and daVinci.
    • Summarize how the theological movements during the Reformation transformed society by comparing the impact of the ideas of Martin Luther and John Calvin.
    • Analyze migration, settlement patterns, and cultural diffusion caused by the competition for resources among European nations during the Age of Exploration including the impact of the Columbian Exchange and the Atlantic slave trade.
  • Content Standard 3: The student will evaluate modern revolutionary movements influenced by the European Age of Absolutism and the Enlightenment including political, economic, and social transformations.
    • Cite specific textual and visual evidence to analyze the impact of the Enlightenment including the theories of John Locke and Adam Smith on modern government and economic institutions.
    • Compare and contrast the causes and lasting impact on England’s Glorious Revolution, the American Revolution, and the French Revolution on the decline of monarchy and on the rise of representative government including the impact of the Napoleonic Wars and the resulting Congress of Vienna.