Rhode Island

Rhode Island Regulations of the Board of Regents for Elementary and Secondary Education:

Section L-6-3.1 Graduation Requirements: While graduation requirements are set by local education agencies, students are required to demonstrate proficiency in all core areas, including social studies, and to successfully complete 3 courses of history/social studies.

2013 Rhode Island General Laws, Title 16:

R.I. Gen. Laws § 16-22-2 Civics Education: “The general assembly recognizes the importance of a citizenry well educated in the principles of democracy as enunciated in the constitutions of the state of Rhode Island and the United States…These standards shall include, but not be limited to, the history of the state of Rhode Island, representative government, the rights and duties of actively engaged citizenship, and the principles of democracy.”

 

Rhode Island Grade Span Expectations for Social Studies

Grades K-2

  • C&G 1 (K-2) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms and purposes of government by…
    • Identifying rules and consequences for them in different settings (e.g., home, bus, classroom, cafeteria, etc.) and explaining why we need rules and who makes the rules.
  • C&G 1 (K-2) —2 Students demonstrate an understanding of sources of authority and use of power, and how they are/can be changed by…
    • Identifying authority figures who make, apply, and enforce rules (e.g., family, school, police, firefighters, etc.) and how these people help to meet the needs of the common good.
  • C&G 2 (K-2) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of United States government (local, state, national) by…
    • Identifying elected leadership titles/basic roles at different levels of government (e.g., mayor is the leader of a city, governor is the leader of the state, president is the leader of the country).
  • C&G 2 (K-2) —2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the democratic values and principles underlying the U.S. government by…
    • Identifying symbols and national holidays used to depict Americans’ shared democratic values, principles, and beliefs (e.g., American flag, Pledge of Allegiance, Presidents’ Day, Independence Day).
  • C&G 4 (K-2) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of political systems and political processes by…
    • Identifying forms of civic participation (e.g., voting, conducting a survey).

Grades 3-4

  • C&G 1 (3-4) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms and purposes of government by…
    • Making, applying, and enforcing rules (home, school, community).
    • Comparing similarities between a rule and a law.
    • Citing examples of services that local and state governments provide for the common good.
  • C&G 2 (3-4) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of United States government (local, state, national) by…
    • Identifying the levels (local, state, national) and three branches of government, as defined by the U.S. Constitution, and the roles and purposes of each (e.g., checks and balances).
    • Describing the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights and explaining why they are important.
  • C&G 2 (3-4) —2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the democratic values and principles underlying the U.S. government by…
    • Identifying and explaining the meaning of symbols and national holidays used to depict Americans’ shared democratic values, principles, and beliefs (e.g., colors of the American flag, Pledge of Allegiance, bald eagle, Presidents’ Day, Independence Day).
    • Using a variety of sources (e.g., Bill of Rights, Declaration of Independence, trade books, picture books, songs, artwork) to illustrate the basic values and principles of democracy (e.g., Statue of Liberty represents freedom, Independent Man on State House represents individual rights, E Pluribus Unum represents national unity, This Land is Your Land represents respect for diversity).

Grades 5-6

  • C&G 1 (5-6) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by…
    • Identifying the basic functions of government.
    • Listing and defining various forms of government (e.g., dictatorship, democracy, parliamentary, monarchy).
    • Citing examples of when major changes in governments have occurred (e.g., American, Revolution, Hammurabi’s Code, Rhode Island Royal Charter/RI Constitution).
  • C&G 1 (5-6) —2 Students demonstrate an understanding of sources of authority and use of power, and how they are/can be changed by…
    • Identifying and summarizing the rule of law, using various enduring/ significant documents (e.g., Magna Carta, Preamble of U.S. Constitution, U.N. Rights of the Child, “I Have A Dream” speech).
    • Identifying and describing the role of individuals (e.g., Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Thomas Paine) as authority figures/leaders in the creation of government.
  • C&G 2 (5-6) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of United States government (local, state, national) by…
    • Identifying and describing the function of the three branches (i.e., checks and balances, separation of powers).
    • Identifying how power is divided and shared among the levels of the United States government.
    • Explaining how a bill becomes a law.
  • C&G 2 (5-6) —2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the democratic values and principles underlying the U.S. government by…
    • Exploring democratic values such as: respect, property, compromise, liberty, self-government, and self-determination.
    • Identifying enduring documents (e.g., Bill of Rights, U.S. Constitution) that reflect the underlying principles of the United States.
    • Exhibiting and explaining what it means to be a responsible citizen in the community.
  • C&G 3 (5-6) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of citizens’ rights and responsibilities by…
    • Identifying citizen’s rights in a democratic society (personal, economic, legal, and civic).
  • C&G 3 (5-6) —2 Students demonstrate an understanding of how individuals and groups exercise (or are denied) their rights and responsibilities by…
    • Identifying and explaining specific ways rights may or may not be exercised (e.g., civil rights).
    • Explaining the judicial process — due process — local, state, and federal (e.g., school discipline policy, truancy court, appeals process).
  • C&G 4 (5-6) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of political systems and political processes by…
    • Identifying, comparing, and contrasting different “political systems” (e.g., monarchy, democracy, feudal).

Grades 7-8

  • C&G 1 (7-8) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by…
    • Identifying and explaining the origins and basic functions of government.
    • Comparing and contrasting different forms of government (e.g., dictatorship, democracy, theocracy, republic, monarchy).
    • Explaining what happens when political structures do or do not meet the needs of people (e.g., democracy v. anarchy).
  • C&G 1 (7-8) —2 Students demonstrate an understanding of sources of authority and use of power, and how they are/can be changed by…
    • Comparing and contrasting the key stages of development of the rule of law, as presented in various enduring/significant documents (e.g. Magna Carta, Preamble of U.S. Constitution, U.N. Rights of the Child, “I Have A Dream” speech).
    • Explaining why the rule of law is necessary to the role of government (e.g., debate/Robert’s Rules of Order, classroom procedures).
    • Defining and identifying the nature of authority and sources of power.
  • C&G 2 (7-8) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of United States government (local, state, national) by…
    • Identifying the functions of the three branches of government; and analyzing and describing the interrelationship among the branches (i.e., checks and balances/cause and effect, separation of powers).
    • Explaining how and why power is divided and shared among the levels of government (federalism).
    • Tracing the process of how an idea transforms into a bill and then becomes a law.
  • C&G 2 (7-8) —2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the democratic values and principles underlying the U.S. government by…
    • Explaining how democratic values are reflected in enduring documents, political speeches (discourse), and group actions.
    • Using a variety of sources to identify and defend a position on a democratic principle (e.g., self- government in Declaration of Independence, women’s rights in Seneca Falls Declaration, Habeas Corpus in Laws of 12 Tables, freedom of religion in Washington’s letter to the Touro Synagogue).
    • Exhibiting and explaining what it means to be a responsible citizen in the state and nation.
  • C&G 3 (7-8) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of citizens’ rights and responsibilities by…
    • Evaluating and defending a position on issues involving individual rights (personal, economic, legal, or political rights reflected in the Bill of Rights).
  • C&G 3 (7-8) —2 Students demonstrate an understanding of how individuals and groups exercise (or are denied) their rights and responsibilities by…
    • Identifying the impact of an historic court case.
  • C&G 4 (7-8) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of political systems and political processes by…
    • Evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of various political systems (e.g., dictatorship, oligarchy, monarchy, democracy, theocracy).

Grades 9-12

  • C&G 1 (9-12) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by…
    • Describing or explaining competing ideas about the purposes and functions of politics and government.
    • Comparing and contrasting different forms of government and their purposes.
    • Explaining how a political ideology is reflected in the form and structure of a government (e.g., Democracy — Democratic republic).
    • Distinguishing between the rule of law and the “rule of men” (e.g., Korematsu v. U.S. and Japanese internment during WWII).
  • C&G 1 (Ext) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of origins, forms, and purposes of government by…
    • Analyzing competing ideas about the purposes and functions of politics and government.
  • C&G 1 (9-12) —2 Students demonstrate an understanding of sources of authority and use of power, and how they are/can be changed by…
    • Identifying how actions of a government affect relationships involving the individual, society and the government (e.g., Homeland Security).
    • Explaining how political authority is obtained and legitimized.
    • Examining the historical origins of power and how that power has been exercised over time (e.g., divine right, popular sovereignty, social contract, “regime of truth”).
  • C&G 2 (9-12) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of United States government (local, state, national) by…
    • Evaluating, taking, and defending positions on a current issue regarding the judicial protection of individual or state rights via judicial review.
    • Analyzing the basic structures of government in the U.S. (e.g., national, state, local; branches of federal government) through researching a current or historical issue or event.
    • Critically examining the principles, traditions, and precedents of American constitutional government.
  • C&G 2 (9-12) —2 Students demonstrate an understanding of the democratic values and principles underlying the U.S. government by…
    • Interpreting and analyzing the sources of the U.S. democratic tradition in the Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution, and other documents (e.g., RI Constitution, Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments & Resolutions, Supreme Court decisions, Pledge of Allegiance).
    • Analyzing the inherent challenges involved in balancing majority rule and minority rights.
    • Identifying and giving examples of the discrepancies between democratic ideals and the realities of American social and political life (e.g., equal protection under the law and the reality of discrimination).
    • Discussing different historical understandings/perspectives of democracy.
  • C&G 3 (9-12) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of citizens’ rights and responsibilities by…
    • Comparing and contrasting different perspectives on provisions found in the Bill of Rights (e.g., flag burning and the First Amendment).
    • Comparing and contrasting human rights provided for in various seminal documents or materials (e.g., Declaration of the Rights of Man, Universal Declaration of Rights, International Convention on the Rights of the Child, and other international documents).
  • C&G 3 (9-12) —2 Students demonstrate an understanding of how individuals and groups exercise (or are denied) their rights and responsibilities by…
    • Describing and giving examples of how access to institutions can affect justice, reward, and power in the U.S.
    • Identifying and explaining ways individuals and groups have exercised their rights in order to transform society (e.g., Civil Rights Movement, women’s suffrage).
  • C&G 4 (9-12) —1 Students demonstrate an understanding of political systems and political processes by…
    • Comparing and contrasting U.S. systems of government with others.
    • Analyzing multiple perspectives on an historical or current controversial issue (e.g., immigration, environmental policy, escalation of the war in Vietnam, Brown v. Board of Education).
  • HP 3 (9-12) — 1 Students demonstrate an understanding of how the past frames the present by…
    • Gathering evidence of circumstances and factors contributing to contemporary problems (e.g., civil rights movement, sexual revolution).