South Dakota

South Dakota Administrative Rules, Curriculum:

ARSD 24:43:11:02: “Three units or more of social studies that include a minimum of the following: (a) One unit of U.S. history; (b) One-half unit of U.S. government; (c) One-half unit of geography; and (d) One-half unit of world history.”

South Dakota Social Studies Content Standards

South Dakota Social Studies Content Standards specify grade-specific standards K-8 and grade-span standards grades 9-12. According to the Social Studies Content Standards document, the standards are to be used as a framework to assist student growth in skills which include “Responsible citizenship found in the Civics (Government) standards. … The foundation of these state standards is designed to foster responsible decision making that benefits the local and tribal community, state, nation, and world. Responsible citizens are informed and active. They recognize their roles in connection with the world. … One of the two Civics (Government) indicators emphasizes the importance of citizenship and civic literacy.” Social Studies Goal #4 is “Students will understand the historical development and contemporary role of governmental power and authority.” Indicators for this goal focus on “forms and purposes of government in relationship to the needs of individuals and societies,” historical development of U.S. government, and constitutional rights and responsibilities. Civics standards exist for grades K-5 and 9-12. (page 2)

Grade 1

  • 1.US.1.1. Students are able to use timelines from birth to present to relate self and family to changes over time.
    • Identify the accomplishments of historical  figures.
  • 1.US.2.1. Students are able to connect people and events honored in commemorative holiday.
  • 1.C.1.1. Students are able to identify American symbols and landmarks.

Grade 2

  • 2.US.1.1. Students are able to place important historical events in the order in which they occurred.
    • Example: Use a timeline to order pilgrims, Revolutionary War, and wagon trains.
  • 2.US.1.3. Students are able to describe ways historical figures contributed to modern-day life.
    • Examples: Thomas Jefferson-Declaration of Independence; Rosa Parks-civil rights; Susan B. Anthony-suffrage; Sequoyah-Cherokee alphabet.
  • 2.C.1.2. Students are able to explain the difference between rules and laws.
  • 2.C.1.2. Students are able to identify why laws are needed in a community and why there are legal consequences for lawbreakers.
  • 2.C.1.3. Students are able to explain the basic political roles of leaders in the larger community.
  • 2.C.2.1. Students are able to describe the meaning of majority rule and its related function in a democracy.

Grade 3

  • 3.C.1.2. Students are able to recognize government agencies and their roles in a community.
  • 3.C.1.3. Students are able to explain the meaning and importance of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence.
  • 3.C.1.4. Students are able to explain why communities have rules and laws.

Grade 4

  • 4.C.1.1. Students are able to describe the way the government provides for the needs of its citizens.
  • 4.C.2.1. Students are able to describe the actions and rights of a responsible citizen.

Grade 5

  • 5.US.1.3. Students are able to identify influential people and key events during the American Revolution.
    • Identify the role of key individuals.
    • Recall the key events and battles of the American Revolution.
  • 5.US.2.1. Students are able to identify the reasons that led to the development of colonial America.
  • 5.US.2.2. Students are able to describe the political relationship between the colonies and England.
  • 5.US.2.3. Students are able to compare and contrast social, economic, and philosophical differences between the North and the South.
  • 5.C.1.1. Students are able to define basic differences between various forms of government.
  • 5.C.1.2. Students are able to define and describe the roles of democratic government of the United States.
    • Example: levels of government: local, state, and national.
    • Example: branches of government: legislative, executive, and judicial.

Grade 6

  • 6.C.1.1. Students are able to relate forms of governments to their civilizations.
  • 6.C.2.1. Students are able to recognize how historical civilizations influence the rights and responsibilities of citizens today.

Grade 8

  • 8.US.1.1. Students are able to relate events and outcomes of the American Revolution to sources of conflict, roles of key individuals and battles, and political documents.
    • Identify and explain the sources of conflict which led to the American Revolution.
    • Associate key individuals with their roles in the American Revolution.
  • 8.US.1.3. Students are able to describe the sources of conflict, key individuals, battles, and political documents of the Civil War period.
    • Outline the major sources of conflict.
    • Identify key individuals and explain their roles in the Civil War.
    • Associate significant political documents and speeches with events.
  • 8.US.1.4. Students are able to summarize the political and social changes in the United States during Reconstruction.
    • Outline the political effects of Reconstruction in the United States.
    • Outline the social changes of Reconstruction in the United States.
  • 8.US.2.1. Students are able to explain the impact of the American Revolution on American philosophies.
    • Compare the political and social differences between 13 separate colonies and one independent nation.
    • Contrast the various philosophies of American colonists before and after the Revolution.
  • 8.US.2.2. Students are able to summarize the influence of westward expansion and reform movements on American culture, philosophies, and religions.
    • Explain the Abolitionist Movement and its impact on slavery.
  • 8.US.2.3. Students are able to summarize the impacts of the Civil War on American culture and philosophies.
    • Describe the changing roles of women.
  • 8.US.2.4. Students are able to describe the impact of various cultures and philosophies on the U.S. during Reconstruction.
    • Describe how the abolition of slavery affected the life of African-Americans in the United States’ society.
    • Describe the changing federal policy toward Native Americans.
  • 8.C.1.1. Students are able to describe the basic structure of government adopted through compromises by the Constitutional Convention.
  • 8.C.1.3. Students are able to describe the successes and problems of the government under the Articles of Confederation.
  • 8.C.1.4. Students are able to describe the impact of the Civil War on the United States government.
  • 8.C.2.1. Students are able to describe the fundamental liberties and rights states in the first 15 amendments of the Constitution.

High School US History

  • 9-12.US.1.1. Students are able to explain the cause-effect relationships and legacy that distinguish significant historical periods from Reconstruction to the present.
    • Identify social and political origins, accomplishments, and limitations of Progressivism.
    • Explain the New Deal and its legacy (social and economic).
  • 9-12.US.1.2. Students are able to relate previously learned information of these time periods to the context of succeeding time periods.
    • Examples: American Revolution, Westward Movement, Civil War/Reconstruction.
  • 9-12.US.2.2. Students are able to describe the cause and effects of cultural, economic, religious, political, and social reform movements on the development of the U.S.
    • Political movements.
      • Examples: Women’s suffrage, Populists and Progressives, Isolationists, Anarchists, Anti- communism, Civil Rights movement, American Indian movement, Reagan revolution.

High School World History

  • 9-12.W.1.1. Students are able to explain the cause-effect relationships and legacy that distinguish significant historical periods from the Renaissance to the present.
    • Explain the causes and impact of the Reformation.
    • Identify significant ideas and achievements of the Scientific Revolution and the Age of Enlightenment.
      • Examples: Age of Enlightenment (the philosophies of Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Rousseau).

High School Civics (Government)

  • 9-12.C.1.1. Students are able to explain the characteristics of various forms of government.
  • 9-12.C.1.2. Students are able to determine the influence of major historical documents and ideals on the formation of the United States government.
    • Examples: documents – Magna Carta, Petition of Rights, English Bill of Rights, Mayflower Compact, British Colonial legislation (Intolerable Acts, Stamp Act, Writs of Assistance), Articles of Confederation, Colonial/early state constitutions, Declaration of Independence.
    • Examples: ideals – Greek and Roman governments, League of Iroquois Confederation, Social Contract.
    • Examples: philosophers – Locke, Hobbes, Rousseau, Montesquieu, Machiavelli.
  • 9-12.C.1.3. Students are able to identify the principles of the American Constitution.
    • Separation of Powers/Checks and Balances.
      • Examples: legislative, executive, judicial.
      • Examples: Describe the structures, functions, and powers of the branches of government.
    • Federalism-division of power among national, state, local, and tribal.
    • Limited Government (Rule of law/Constitutionalism).
    • Popular Sovereignty.
    • Judicial Review.
      • Examples: Landmark decisions of the United States Supreme Court (Marbury v. Madison, Miranda v. Arizona, Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, Roe v. Wade).
    • Amendment Process.
    • Rationale for constitutional amendments and the conflicts they address.
  • 9-12.C.1.4. Students are able to explain the principles of American democracy.
    • Fundamental worth of the individual.
    • Equality of all persons.
    • Majority rule/minority rights.
    • Necessity of compromise.
    • Individual freedom.
  • 9-12.C.2.1. Students are able to describe the means of influencing and/or participating in a republic.
    • Describe the roles of the citizen in the legislative and electoral process.
    • Describe the benefits, duties, and responsibilities of citizenship in the United States.
    • Describe the Electoral College process.
  • 9-12.C.2.2. Students are able to interpret the meaning of basic constitutional rights guaranteed to citizens.
    • Bill of Rights and other amendments.

Advanced High School Civics (Government)

  • 9-12.C.1.1A. Students are able to compare the United States’ political systems with those of major democratic and authoritarian nations in terms of the structures and powers of political institutions.
  • 9-12.C.2.1A. Students are able to enumerate the basic constitutional rights guaranteed to citizens and their related impacts on society.
  • 9-12.C.2.2A. Students are able to analyze and explain the purpose of politics/political activity and the related implications for United States citizens.
  • 9-12.C.2.3A. Students are able to identify various issues involving individual rights and responsibilities in relation to the general welfare.