Tennessee

Rules of State Board of Education:

Rule 0520-1-3-.05 State Curriculum and Graduation Requirements: (1) For grades K-8, “The social studies program, provided annually, shall be based on state curriculum standards and shall be developmentally appropriate, with instruction focusing on experiences to enable students to learn abut themselves and others in the community, state, nation and world.” (2) For grades 9-12, “The social studies curriculum shall consist of three units and shall include United States history, world history/world geography, economics, and government. The requirement may be met either by combining these subjects or by separate courses.” (3) “The curriculum shall include African American history and culture.” (page 16)

Tennessee Code Annotated:

Tenn. Code Ann. § 49-6-1028: Section 3 (2) Students shall be taught about the formation of the governments of the United States and Tennessee using federal and state foundational documents. They shall also be taught the significance and relevance of those federal and state foundational documents today. This instruction shall include: (A) The historical and present-day significance of the Declaration of Independence; (B) How the United States Constitution establishes the federal government and the characteristics of the republic created by it; (C) How the United States Constitution with the Bill of Rights and the Tennessee Constitution with the Declaration of Rights are applicable in today’s society; (D) How the United States Constitution is changed and the changes that have been made to it since 1787; (E) Why Tennessee has had three constitutions, the Constitutions of 1796, 1834, and 1870, and how changes have been made to the Tennessee Constitution of 1870; and (F) How other foundational documents of the United States and Tennessee aided in the formation of the federal and state governments.”

Tennessee Social Studies Standards

Grade K

  • K.15 Give examples that show the meaning of the following concepts: authority, fairness, justice, responsibility, and rules.
  • K.16 Identify the following state and national symbols:
    • The American flag and its colors and shapes
    • The Tennessee flag and its colors and shapes
    • The words of the Pledge of Allegiance
    • The national symbols of the bald eagle, Statue of Liberty, and the White House
  • K.18 Recognize and name the current President of the United States.
  • K.19 Use drawings, dictating, and writing to participate in shared research describing the role of the President.
  • K.20 Identify roles of authority figures at home, at school, and in government to include parents, school principal, volunteers, police officers, fire and rescue workers, mayor, governor, and president.
  • K.21 Explain the purpose of rules and laws.
  • K.22 Demonstrate good citizenship and identify characteristics of citizens of the United States as described in the Constitution.
  • K.29 Participate in shared research projects to identify and describe the events or people celebrated during state and national holidays and why we celebrate them:
    • Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
    • Presidents’ Day (George Washington and Abraham Lincoln)
    • Memorial Day
    • Independence Day
    • Columbus Day o Veterans’ Day o Thanksgiving

Grade 1

  • 1.25 Identify the current city/county Mayor, Governor, and President, and explain their roles in government.
  • 1.26 Explain the importance of patriotic traditions, including the recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance, appropriate behavior during the playing of our National Anthem, and demonstrate appropriate flag etiquette.
  • 1.27 Explain that our state’s and country’s laws are based upon the Constitution.
  • 1.29 Describe the fundamental principles of American democracy, including respect for the rights, opinions and property of others, fair treatment for all, and respect for the rules by which they live.
  • 1.39 Use informational text to help describe the importance of celebrating these national holidays:
    • Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
    • Presidents’ Day
    • Memorial Day
    • Independence Day
    • Columbus Day
    • Veterans’ Day
    • Thanksgiving Day
  • 1.42 Ask and answer questions about historical events that helped shape our Nation and explain the role Tennesee played in these events.

Grade 2

  • 2.21 Recite and analyze the lyrics of “The Star Spangled Banner” to determine the meaning of the song and its origins in the War of 1812.
  • 2.22 Identify the location and summarize the significance of well-known sites and landmarks in the United States including Mt. Rushmore, The White House, Statue of Liberty, Golden Gate Bridge, St. Louis Arch, Natchez Trace, and Grand Canyon.
  • 2.23 Compare the branches of Tennessee’s government to the national government.
  • 2.24 With guidance and support, read how government systems were laid out in the Constitution of the United States and the Tennessee Constitution to form three balanced branches with checks and balances.
  • 2.25 Create a graphic organizer to explain the three branches of government and the basic role of each.
  • 2.26 Summarize how the United States makes laws, determines whether laws have been violated, and the consequences for breaking different types of laws.
  • 2.27 Explain the development and consequences of rules in the United States, including traffic laws, laws on drugs and alcohol, laws against harm, and basic tax laws.
  • 2.28 Explain how individuals living in societies went from developing rules for small groups (as in early colonial times) to developing rules for larger groups, including states and nations.
  • 2.29 Identify the rights and responsibilities of citizens of the United States.
  • 2.30 Examine the amendments written to protect all citizens’ right to vote.
  • 2.31 Compare the ways one becomes a citizen (by birth or naturalization).
  • 2.32 Participate in shared research using biographies to interpret the significance of contributions made by people of the United States, recounting or describing key ideas and details from the texts. Teachers may choose any biographies. Some suggestions are as follows: John Smith, Pocahontas, Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Benjamin Banneker, Nancy Ward, James Robertson, John Sevier, Sequoyah, David Crockett, Sacagawea, Sam Houston, Abraham Lincoln, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Fredrick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, Sitting Bull, Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells, the Wright Brothers Marian Anderson, Thurgood Marshall, Rosa Parks, Jackie Robinson, Cesar Chavez, Martin Luther King, Jr., Neil Armstrong, Roberto Clemente, Wilma Rudolph, Sally Ride, and Bill Gates.
  • 2.36 Explain the connection between a series of events in United States history. Teachers may choose any events. Some suggestions are as follows: Jamestown, Plymouth, Westward Expansion, Trail of Tears, Industrial Revolution, Ellis Island, Suffrage Movement, Great Depression, Dust Bowl, the Civil Rights Movement, and wars involving the United States.
  • 2.39 Summarize the importance of commemorative months including Black History, Women’s History, Hispanic Heritage, and American Indian Heritage.

Grade 3

  • 3.16 Use timelines and historical passages to summarize the history of a region, including events, inventions/inventors, artists, writers, and political figures. (C, G, H, P, TN) Suggestions are as follows: Christopher Columbus, Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, Daniel Boone, Nancy Ward, Thomas Jefferson, Betsy Ross, Noah Webster, Abraham Lincoln, Susan B. Anthony, Harriett Tubman, Geronimo, George Washington Carver, Georgia O’Keefe, Amelia Earhart, E.B. White, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Dian Fossey, and Barack Obama.
  • 3.28 Discuss the structure and purpose of government. (P)
  • 3.29 Compare and contrast the national governments of Canada, Mexico, and the United States. (P)
  • 3.45 Compare and contrast a monarchy and a democratic form of government. (P)

Grade 4

  • 4.13 Locate the first 13 colonies and explain how their location and geographic features influenced their development and settlement patterns. (G)
  • 4.14 Write informative texts identifying major leaders and groups responsible for the founding of colonies in North America and the reasons for their founding, including: (C, E, H, P)
    • Lord Baltimore, Maryland
    • John Smith, Virginia
    • Roger Williams, Rhode Island o John Winthrop, Massachusetts o  William Bradford, Plymouth o James Oglethorpe, Georgia
    • William Penn, Pennsylvania
  • 4.15 Cite and explain examples from informational texts about how economic opportunities and political, religious, and social institutions evolved in the colonial era. (C, E, G, H, P)
  • 4.16 Making use of primary documents, analyze the early democratic ideas and practices that emerged during the colonial period, including the significance of representative assemblies and town meetings and contrast these with the presence of enslavement in all colonies. (P)
  • 4.17 Describe the major religious tenets of the earliest colonies, including: (C)
    • Puritanism in Massachusetts
    • Quakerism in Pennsylvania
  • 4.18 Explain various reasons why people came to the colonies, including profit, religious freedom, slavery, and indentured servitude. (C, E, H)
    • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Consider: excerpts from the Mayflower Compact; excerpts from the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut.
  • 4.21 Describe the various contributions made by Benjamin Franklin to the development of a unique American society, including his scientific experiments and inventions, the development of the Albany Plan and the Join or Die political cartoon. (C, H, P)
  • 4.23 Explain how political, religious, and economic ideas and interests brought about the Revolution, including: (C, E, P)
    • resistance to imperial policy (Proclamation of 1763)
    • the Stamp Act
    • the Townshend Acts
    • taxes on tea
    • “taxation without representation”
    • Coercive Acts
  • 4.24 Explain the different forms of protests Americans used to try to change British policies including the Boston Tea Party, tarring and feathering, letter writing, and boycotts. (E, P)
  • 4.26 Describe the significance of the First and Second Continental Congresses and of the Committees of Correspondence. (P)
  • 4.28 Identify the people and events associated with the Declaration of Independence and cite evidence from the Declaration to determine its significance to the development of American Democracy. (H, P)
  • 4.29 Analyze the influences of key leaders during this period, including: (P)
    • Patrick Henry
    • Alexander Hamilton
    • Thomas Jefferson
    • George Washington o Benjamin  Franklin o Thomas Paine
    • John Adams o  Sam Adams  o John Hancock
    • Benedict Arnold
  • 4.33 Write an opinion piece with supporting details contrasting how the ideals set forth in the Declaration of Independence clashed with the existence of slavery. (E, P)
  • 4.35 Integrate evidence from several texts describing the different roles women played during the Revolution including Abigail Adams, Molly Pitcher, Phyllis Wheatley, and Mercy Otis Warren. (C, E)
    • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: Declaration of Independence; excerpts from “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” speech, Patrick Henry; selected Letters from Abigail Adams.
  • 4.37 Analyze the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, including no power to tax, weak central government, and the impact of Shay’s Rebellion. (P)
  • 4.39 Identify the various leaders of the Constitutional Convention and analyze the major issues they debated, including: (C, E, H)
    • distribution of power between the states and federal government
    • Great Compromise
    • Slavery and the 3/5 Compromise
    • George Washington and James Madison
  • 4.40 Explain the ratification process and describe the conflict between Federalists and AntiFederalists over ratification, including the need for a Bill of Rights. (H, P)
  • 4.41 Describe the principles embedded in the Constitution, including: (P)
    • purposes of government listed in the Preamble
    • separation of powers
    • branches of government
    • check and balances
    • the amendment process
    • principle of judicial review
    • recognition of and protection of individual rights in the 1st Amendment
  • 4.42 Write an opinion piece with supporting detail from primary sources that defends the ratification of the Constitution. (P)
    • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: Preamble of the Constitution; excerpts from Articles 1, 2, and 3 of the United States Constitution; 1st Amendment.
  • 4.43 Describe the events, precedents, and successes of the presidency of George Washington and list his cabinet members. (H)
  • 4.46 Write an opinion piece using supporting detail explaining the political beliefs of Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson leading to the political parties. (H, P)
  • 4.50 Interpret the meaning of the lyrics of the song “The Star-Spangled Banner.” (P)
  • 4.65 Identify prominent people and reform movements in the United States during the mid-19th century, including: (C, P)
    • Dorothea Dix and her quest for prison reform and help for the mentally ill
    • Horace Mann and public education
    • Nat Turner and his resistance to enslavement
    • Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison and the abolition of slavery
  • 4.67 Explain the events, political debate, and outcome of the Compromise of 1850 and the Kansas and Nebraska Act. (H, P)

Grade 5

  • 5.1 Compare and contrast the myth of the Antebellum South to the realities of the region including the harshness of slavery, increased immigration to urban areas, and growth of railroads. (C, G, P)
  • 5.2 Interpret the sectional differences between the North and the South in economics, transportation, and population. (C, E)
  • 5.3 Use primary sources to analyze multiple samples of abolition leaders’ writings and their stance on slavery, including: (C, P)
    • Sojourner Truth
    • Frederick Douglass
    • the Grimke sisters
    • William Lloyd Garrison
  • 5.4 Draw on information from multiple print or digital resources explaining the events that made slavery a national issue during the mid-19th century, including: (C, E, G, P)
    • Missouri Compromise
    • Uncle Tom’s Cabin
    • Compromise of 1850
    • Brook’s attack on Sumner
    • Kansas-Nebraska Act
    • John Brown’s Raid
    • Dred Scott case
  • 5.12 Draw on informational text to explain the roles of the military and civil leaders during the Civil War, including: (C, H, P)
    • Abraham Lincoln o  Jefferson Davis  o Ulysses S.  Grant o Robert E. Lee
    • Frederick Douglas
    • Clara Barton
  • 5.13 Read and write an informative piece summarizing the Gettysburg Address to determine its meaning and significance. (H)
  • 5.16 Evaluate and debate the rationales for the Emancipation Proclamation. (C, P)
  • 5.17 Explain why Lincoln chose Andrew Johnson as his running mate in the election of 1864. (H, P, TN)
  • 5.18 Describe the physical, social, political and economic consequences of the Civil War on the southern United States. (E, G)
  • 5.19 Draw on information from multiple print or digital resources to describe the impact of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln on the nation. (H)
  • 5.20 Analyze the goals and accomplishments of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments, Freedmen’s Bureau, and Fisk University to help former slaves begin a new life. (C, H, P, TN)
  • 5.21 Compare and contrast the different Reconstruction plans of Lincoln, Johnson, and Congress. (H, P)
  • 5.22 Integrate information from several texts about the intent and failure of the impeachment of Andrew Johnson. (H, P, TN)
  • 5.23 Analyze why the Radical Republicans turned to military Reconstruction and the backlash resulting in the rise of the Ku Klux Klan, black codes, and vigilante justice. (H, P, TN)
  • 5.24 Explain the impact of the Tennessee Constitutional Convention of 1870, including poll taxes, segregation, and funds for public education. (E, P, TN)
  • 5. 25 Explain the compromise that ended Reconstruction with the election of Rutherford B. Hayes. (P)
    • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: The Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln; the Emancipation Proclamation; Second Inaugural Address, Abraham Lincoln; the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
  • 5.40 Analyze the major goals, struggles, and achievements of the Progressive Era, including attacking racial discrimination, child labor, big business, conservation, and alcohol use: (C, E, P)
    • Anti-Trust laws
    • 16th, 17th, 18th and 19th Amendments
    • immigration reform
  • 5.54 Evaluate the constitutionality of Japanese internment during the war. (C, E, P, H)
  • 5.65 Analyze the key events and struggles during the Civil Rights Movement, including: (C, E, H, P)
    • Brown v. Board of Education
    • Non-violent protest and the influence of the Highlander Folk School
    • Central High School-Little Rock, Arkansas and Clinton High School in Clinton, Tennessee
    • Montgomery Bus Boycott and Rosa Parks
    • Tent Cities in Fayette and Haywood Counties
    • Nashville Sit-Ins and Diane Nash
    • Freedom Riders
    • Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • 5.66 Explain the effect President Kennedy’s assassination had on the country, including passage of the Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act, and continuing the space program. (H, P)
  • 5.74 Identify the significance of the election of 2008, including the primary run of Hillary Clinton and election of Barack Obama. (C, H, P)
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: “I Have a Dream Speech” and “Letter from Birmingham Jail”, Martin Luther King, Jr.

Grade 6

  • 6.48 Trace the transition from tyranny and oligarchy to early democratic forms of government and back to dictatorship in ancient Greece, including the significance of the development of the idea of citizenship. (C, H, P)
  • 6.49 Explain how the development of democratic political concepts in ancient Greece lead to the origins of direct Democracy and representative Democracy, including: (C, H, P)
    • the “polis” or city-state
    • civic participation and voting rights
    • legislative bodies
    • constitution writing
    • rule of law
  • 6.63 Describe the government of the Roman Republic and its contribution to the development of democratic principles, including the rule of law (a written constitution), separation of powers, checks and balances, representative government, and civic duty. (C, H, P)

Grade 7

  • 7.36 Conduct a short research project explaining the significance of developments in medieval English legal and constitutional practices and their importance in the rise of modern democratic thought and representative institutions including trial by jury, the common law, Magna Carta, parliament, habeas corpus, and an independent judiciary in England. (H, P)
  • 7.39 Explain the importance of the Catholic church as a political, intellectual, and aesthetic institution, including founding of universities, political and spiritual roles of the clergy, creation of monastic and mendicant religious orders, preservation of the Latin language and religious texts, Thomas Aquinas’s synthesis of classical philosophy with Christian theology and the concept of “natural law.” (C, H, P)
  • 7.55 Outline the reasons for the growing discontent with the Catholic Church, including the main ideas of Martin Luther (salvation by faith), John Calvin (predestination), Desiderius Erasmus (free will), and William Tyndale (translating the Bible into English), and their attempts to reconcile what they viewed as God’s word with Church action. (C, H, P)
  • 7.56 Engage effectively in collaborative discussions explaining Protestants’ new practices of church self-government and the influence of those practices on the development of democratic practices and ideas of federalism. (C, H, P)
  • 7.61 Trace how the main ideas of the Enlightenment can be traced back to such movements and epochs as the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the Greeks, the Romans, and Christianity. (C, H, P)
  • 7.62 Describe the accomplishments of major Enlightenment thinkers, including Locke and Charles- Louis Montesquieu. (C, H)

Grade 8

  • 8.1 Explain the primary motivations for English colonization of the New World, including the rise of the middle class (joint stock companies), the need to move surplus population, and the search for religious freedom. (E, G, H)
  • 8.2 Trace and explain the founding of Jamestown, including: (E, G, H)
    • Virginia Company
    • James River o John  Smith o Pocahontas o Powhatan
    • John Rolfe
    • “starving time”
    • Tobacco
    • Bacon’s Rebellion
    • Indentured servants and slaves
    • The arrival of women
    • House of Burgesses
  • 8.3 Explain the founding of the Plymouth Colony, including the Separatists, William Bradford, Mayflower, Mayflower Compact, and Squanto. (C, G, H, P)
  • 8.4 Analyze the reasons for the settlement of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and the events and the key figures of the colonies, including: (C, E, G, H, P )
    • Non-Separatists/Puritans
    • John Winthrop
    • theocracy
    • Town meetings
    • Anne Hutchinson and Roger Williams-Rhode Island
    • Thomas Hooker-Connecticut
    • Salem Witchcraft Trials
  • 8.5 Describe the settlement of New Netherlands and the subsequent possession of the colony by the English, including: (C, E, G, H)
    • Dutch influences o Peter Stuyvesant o Patroon System
    • Renaming to New York
    • Diverse population
  • 8.6 Analyze the founding of Pennsylvania as a haven for Quakers and the tolerance that drew many different groups to the colony, including: (C, E, H, P)
    • William Penn
    • Philadelphia
    • Role of women
    • Relationship with Indians
  • 8.7 Explain the reasons behind the settlement of the Georgia Colony, including the role of James Oglethorpe and Georgia as a “debtor” colony and a “buffer” colony. (C, E, G, H)
  • 8.13 Analyze the ideas that significantly impacted the development of colonial self-government by citing textual evidence and examining multiple perspectives using excerpts from the following documents: (C, H, P)
    • The First Virginia Charter, 1606
    • The Mayflower Compact, 1620
    • Charter of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1629
    • The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut, 1639
    • The New England Articles of Confederation, 1643
    • The Maryland Toleration Act, 1649
  • 8.14 Identify the origins and development of slavery in the colonies, overt and passive resistance to enslavements, and the Middle Passage. (C, E, G, H, P)
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: excerpts from The First Virginia Charter, 1606; The Mayflower Compact, 1620; excerpts from the Charter of Massachusetts Bay Colony, 1629; excerpts from The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut, 1639; excerpts from The Maryland Toleration Act, 1649; excerpts from The New England Articles of Confederation; excerpts from A Historie of Virginia, (“starving time”) John Smith; excerpts from Of Plymouth Plantation, William Bradford.
  • 8.16 Explain how the practice of salutary neglect, experience with self-government, and wide spread ownership of land fostered individualism and contributed to the American Revolution. (C, E, H, P)
  • 8.17 Evaluate the contributions of Benjamin Franklin to American society in the areas of science, writing and literature, and politics, including analysis of excerpts from Poor Richard’s Almanack, The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, the Albany Plan of Union and the Join or Die cartoon. (C, H, P)
  • 8.18 Describe the impact of the John Peter Zenger trial on the development of the principle of a free press. (C, P)
  • 8.22 Analyze the social, political and economic causes of the American Revolution and the major battles, leaders and events, including: (C, E, H, P)
    • Mercantilism
    • Pontiac’s Rebellion
    • The Proclamation of 1763
    • The Sugar Act, 1764
    • The Quartering Act, 1765
    • The Stamp Act, 1765
    • The Declaratory Act, 1766 o The Townshend Act,  1767 o The Boston Massacre, 1770 o The Boston Tea Party, 1773 o The Intolerable Acts,  1774 o Patrick Henry
    • Benjamin Franklin
    • John Adams o  Sam Adams  o John Hancock
    • Thomas Jefferson
    • Sons of Liberty
  • 8.23 Determine the central ideas expressed in the Declaration of Independence and write an expository piece in which the legacy of these ideas in today’s world is described and validated with supporting evidence from the text. (H, P)
  • 8.24 Using Thomas Paine’s Common Sense and The Crisis identify aspects of the texts that reveal the author’s point of view and purpose including loaded language. (H, P)
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: excerpts from “Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death” speech, Patrick Henry; The Declaration of Independence; excerpts from “Common Sense” and “The Crisis,” Thomas Paine; excerpts from Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
  • 8.28 Describe the significance of the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, and the Mayflower Compact in relation to the development of government in America. (C, H, P)
  • 8.29 Analyze the Land Ordinance of 1785 and the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 and their impact on the future development of western settlement and the spread of public education and slavery. (E, G, P)
  • 8.30 Analyze the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation, including no power to tax, no common currency, no control of interstate commerce, and no executive branch, failure of the Lost State of Franklin and the impact of Shays’ Rebellion. (C, E, H, P, TN)
  • 8.31 Identify the various leaders of the Constitutional Convention and analyze the major issues they debated, including: (C, E, H)
    • distribution of power between the states and federal government
    • Great Compromise
    • Slavery and the 3/5 Compromise
    • George Washington and James Madison
  • 8.32 Explain the ratification process and describe the conflict between Federalists and AntiFederalists over ratification, including the need for a Bill of Rights and concern for state’s rights, citing evidence from the Federalist Papers No. 10 and 51 and other primary source texts. (H, P)
  • 8.33 Describe the principles embedded in the Constitution, including the purposes of government listed in the Preamble, separation of powers, check and balances, the amendment process, federalism, and recognition of and protections of individual rights in the Bill of Rights. (P)
  • 8.34 Write an opinion piece arguing for the importance of a particular right as it impacts individuals and/or groups, using evidence from the Bill of Rights and contemporary informational text. (P)
  • 8.35 Analyze the major events of George Washington’s presidency, including Pinckney’s Treaty, Jay’s Treaty, Whiskey Rebellion, and precedents set in the Farewell Address. (G, P)
  • 8.36 Explain the strict versus loose interpretation of the Constitution and how the conflicts between Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton resulted in the emergence of two political parties by analyzing their views of foreign policy, economic policy (including the National Bank), funding, and assumption of the revolutionary debt. (C, E, G, H, P)
  • 8.37 Explain the controversies that plagued the administration of John Adams, including the conflicts with England and France and the Alien and Sedition Acts. (H, P)
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: excerpts from The Articles of Confederation; the U.S. Constitution; The Federalist Paper # 10 and #51; The Bill of Rights; Washington’s Farewell Address.
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Consider: excerpts from The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison; Patrick Henry’s arguments against ratification.
  • 8.40 Analyze the role played by John Marshall in strengthening the central government, including the key decisions of the Supreme Court – Marbury v. Madison, Gibbons v. Ogden, and McCulloch v. Maryland. (H, P)
  • 8.41 Explain the major events of Thomas Jefferson’s presidency, including his election in 1800, Louisiana Purchase, the defeat of the Barbary pirates, and the Embargo Act. (E, G, H)
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: excerpts from decision in Marbury vs. Madison, John Marshall.
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Consider: excerpts from John Marshall’s decisions in Gibbons v. Ogden and McCulloch v. Maryland.
  • 8.48 Analyze the 19th century reforms influenced by the 2nd Great Awakening such as the Temperance Movement, Prison Reform, Mental Health Reform, and education, including tent meetings, establishment of new churches, Horace Mann, Dorothea Dix, and temperance societies. (C, P)
  • 8.49 Analyze the women’s suffrage movement and its major proponents, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Lucretia Mott, and Susan B. Anthony and examine excerpts from the writings of Stanton, Anthony and Sojourner Truth. (C, P)
  • 8.54 Identify the constitutional issues posed by the doctrine of nullification and secession and analyze the earliest origins of that doctrine. (C, P)
  • 8.55 Explain the events and impact of the presidency of Andrew Jackson, including the “corrupt bargain,” the advent of Jacksonian Democracy, his use of the spoils system and the veto, his battle with the Bank of the United States, the Nullification Crisis and the Indian removal. (C, E, G, H, P, TN)
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: excerpts from “The Declaration of Sentiments,” Senecar Falls Convention.
  • 8.65 Describe the reasons for and the impact of the Missouri Compromise of 1820. (G, H, P)
  • 8.66 Analyze the impact of the various leaders of the abolitionist movement, including John Brown and armed resistance; Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad; William Lloyd Garrison and The Liberator; Frederick Douglass and the Slave Narratives; and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Virginia Hill and Free Hill, Tennessee; Francis Wright and Nashoba Commune; and Elihu Embree’ s The Emancipator. (C, E, H, P, TN)
  • 8.67 Explain the reasons for and the impact of the Compromise of 1850, including the roles played Daniel Webster and John C. Calhoun and the Fugitive Slave Law. (C, E, G, H, P)
  • 8.68 Explain the motivations behind passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, including the rise of the Republican Party, “Bleeding Kansas,” the Sumner Brooks incident, and the John Brown raid on Harper’s Ferry. (H, P)
  • 8.69 Analyze the reasons for and applied by the Supreme Court in the Dred Scott v. Sandford case and the resulting divisiveness between the North and South. (C, H, P)
  • 8.70 Examine the arguments presented by Stephen Douglas and Abraham Lincoln in the Illinois Senate race debate of 1858. (H, P)
  • 8.76 Describe Abraham Lincoln’s presidency and his significant writings and speeches, including  his House Divided speech in 1858, Gettysburg Address in 1863, Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 and inaugural addresses in 1861 and 1865. (C, H, P)
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: excerpts from the “House Divided” speech in 1858, Gettysburg Address in 1863, Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, and Inaugural Addresses in 1861 and 1865, Abraham Lincoln.
  • 8.82 Explain the significance of 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. (P)
  • 8.83 Analyze the choice of Andrew Johnson as Vice-President, his succession to the Presidency, his plan for Reconstruction and his conflict with the Radical Republicans. (H, P, TN)
  • 8.84 Compare the 10 Percent Plan to the Radical Republican Plan for Reconstruction. (C, P)
  • 8.85 Explain the effects of the Freedmen’s Bureau and the restrictions placed on the rights and opportunities of freedmen, including racial segregation and Jim Crow laws. (C, H, P))
  • 8.90 Describe the major developments in Tennessee during the Reconstruction Era, including the Constitutional Convention of 1870, the yellow fever epidemic of 1878 and the election of African- Americans to the General Assembly. (G, P, TN)
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: excerpts from the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution.

African American History

  • AAH.5 Analyze the economic, social, religious, and legal justifications for the establishment and continuation of slavery. (C, E, H)
  • AAH.7 Analyze the role slavery played in the development of nationalism and sectionalism. (C, E, H, P)
  • AAH.13 Evaluate President Lincoln’s views on slavery and the status of freed slaves in the United States. (P)
  • AAH.15 Analyze the effects of Reconstruction on the legal, political, social, cultural, educational, and economic life of freedmen. (H, P)
  • AAH.16 Assess the successes and failures of Reconstruction as they relate to African Americans. (H, P)
  • AAH.17 Assess the economic and social impact of Jim Crow laws on African Americans. (C, H, E)
  • AAH.18 Analyze the legal ramifications of segregation laws and court decisions on American society. (H, P)
  • AAH.19 Compare and contrast the political movements that developed in response to Jim Crow laws, including the Niagara Movement, the NAACP, the Urban League, The Atlanta Compromise, The Farmers’ Union Movement, Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, and the Anti-Lynching Crusade. (H, P)
  • AAH.20 Compare and contrast the African American political and legal personalities of the time period and their impact on American society, including Samuel McElwee, Robert Church Sr., Ida B. Wells, Randolph Miller, and James Napier. (P, TN)
  • AAH.29 Analyze the impact of the Great Depression and the New Deal on the lives of African Americans. (C, H, P)
  • AAH.30 Evaluate the continued quest for civil rights in America. (C, P)
  • AAH.34 Explain how World War II laid the groundwork for the modern Civil Rights Movement. (C, P)
  • AAH.35 Explain how legal victories prior to 1954 inspired and propelled the Civil Rights Movement. (P)
  • AAH.36 Describe the impact of Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas and evaluate the resistance and reaction to it. (H, P)
  • AAH.37 Define various methods used to obtain civil rights. (C, H)
  • AAH.38 Identify various organizations and their role in the Civil Rights Movement, including the Highlander Folk School. (C, H, P, TN)
  • AAH.39 Assess the extent to which the Civil Rights Movement transformed American politics and society. (C, H, P)
  • AAH.40 Determine the impact of the Vietnam War on the Civil Rights Movement. (C, H, P)
  • AAH.41 Summarize the Civil Rights Movement in Tennessee, including the integration of Clinton High School, sit-ins in Nashville, and the activities of Diane Nash and Jim Lawson. (C, H, P, TN) African American Issues in Contemporary Times
  • AAH.42 Identify and analyze how the changing political environment has impacted civil rights. (P)

High School Standards: United States Government

  • GC.1 Cite textual evidence and evaluate multiple points of view to analyze the influence of ancient Greek, Roman, and leading European political thinkers such as John Locke, Charles-Louis Montesquieu, Niccolò Machiavelli, Jean Jacques Rousseau, and William Blackstone on the development of United States government.
  • GC.2 Determine the central ideas in passages from Democracy in America to examine the character of American society, including its religious, political, and economic character, as articulated by Alexis de Tocqueville. (H, P)
  • GC.3 Describe the purposes and functions of government as outlined in the Preamble to the Constitution and demonstrate an understanding of current application of those purposes and functions by identifying current government actions related to each of the six purposes. (P)
  • GC.4 Explain how the Constitution reflects a balance between the promotion of the public good and the protection of individual rights. (H, P)
  • GC.5 Summarize (CC) with supporting evidence why the Founding Fathers established a constitutional system that limited the power of government. (H, P)
  • GC.6 Describe the systems of enumerated and shared powers, the role of organized interests (Federalist Number 10), checks and balances (Federalist Number 51), the importance of an independent judiciary (Federalist Number 78), implied powers, rule of law, federalism, popular sovereignty, and civilian control of the military. (P)
  • GC.7 Analyze how the Bill of Rights limits the powers of the federal government and state governments. (P)
  • GC.8 Assess the claims, reasoning, and evidence of various authors to analyze the tensions within our Republic and the importance of maintaining a balance between the following concepts: (H, P)
    • Majority rule and individual rights
    • Liberty and equality
    • State and national authority in a federal system
    • Civil disobedience and the rule of law
    • Freedom of the press and censorship
    • Relationship of religion and government
    • Relationship of legislation and morality
    • Government regulation and free enterprise
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: excerpts from the Magna Carta; Mayflower Compact; English Bill of Rights; excerpts from Two Treatises of Civil Government, John Locke; Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson; excerpts from The Federalist Papers – 1, 9, 10, 39, 51, 78; excerpts from the Constitution; excerpts from Democracy in America, Alexis De Tocqueville; excerpts from “The Social Contract” by Jean Jacques Rousseau.
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Consider: excerpts from “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” Martin Luther King, Jr.; “The Ballot or the Bullet” speech, Malcolm X; Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom, 1786.
  • GC.9 Analyze Article I of the Constitution as it relates to the legislative branch, including eligibility for office and lengths of terms of representatives and senators; election to office; the roles of the House and Senate in impeachment proceedings; the role of the vice president; the enumerated legislative powers; and the process by which a bill becomes a law. (P)
  • GC.10 Describe in order the steps of the process through which the Constitution can be amended. (P)
  • GC.11 Identify current representatives from Tennessee in the legislative branch of the national government. (P, TN)
  • GC.12 Analyze Article II of the Constitution as it relates to the executive branch, including eligibility for office and length of term, election to and removal from office, the oath of office, and the enumerated executive powers. (P)
  • GC.13 Analyze Article III of the Constitution as it relates to judicial power, including the length of terms of judges and the jurisdiction of the United States Supreme Court. (P)
  • GC.14 Explain the processes of selection and confirmation of Supreme Court justices. (P)
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: excerpts from the Constitution; the Bill of Rights.
  • GC.15 Evaluate various interpretations and determine which explanations best accord with textual evidence to understand the changing interpretations of the Bill of Rights over time including interpretations of the basic freedoms (religion, speech, press, petition, and assembly) articulated in the First Amendment and the due process and equal-protection-of-the-law clauses of the 14th Amendment through examination of the following cases: (H, P)
    • Mapp v. Ohio
    • Tinker v. Des Moines
    • Engel v. Vitale
    • Schenck v. United States
    • Gideon v. Wainwright o Brandenberg v.  Ohio o Texas v. Johnson
    • Reno v. American Civil Liberties Union
  • GC.16 Analyze judicial activism and judicial restraint and the effects of each policy over time (e.g., the Warren and Rehnquist courts). (H, P)
  • GC.17 Assess and cite textual evidence to evaluate the effects of the United States Supreme Court’s interpretations of the Constitution in Marbury v. Madison, McCulloch v. Maryland, and United States v. Nixon and the arguments espoused by each side in these cases. (H, P)
  • GC.18 Explain the controversies that have resulted over evolving interpretations of civil rights, including those in: (H, P) · Plessy v. Ferguson · Brown v. Board of Education · Miranda v. Arizona
  • Regents of the University of California v. Bakke · United States v. Virginia (VMI) · New Jersey v. TLO · Roe v. Wade · Korematsu v. United States · Hazelwood v. Kuhlmeier
  • GC.19 Write an opinion piece with supporting details that argues whether to interpret the U.S. Constitution as a “living document” or to determine the “original intent” of the Founding Fathers. (H)
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Read: excerpts from the United States Supreme Court cases listed in the standards.
  • GC.41 Summarize the central ideas of iconic primary documents to identify the fundamental values and principles of a free society and evaluate their meaning and importance, including the writings and speeches of Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Franklin Roosevelt, John Kennedy, and Ronald Reagan.
  • GC.42 Explain how civil society provides opportunities for individuals to associate for social, cultural, religious, economic, and political purposes. (C, P)
  • GC.43 Explain how civil society makes it possible for people, individually or in association with others, to bring their influence to bear on government in ways other than voting and elections. (C, P)
  • GC.44 Examine the historical role of religion and religious diversity and their impact on society. (C, H, P)
  • GC. 45 Compare and contrast the relationship of government and civil society in constitutional democracies to the relationship of government and civil society in authoritarian and totalitarian regimes. (H, P)
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Consider: The Declaration of Independence, 1776; Gettysburg Address, 1863; “Four Freedoms” speech, Franklin Roosevelt; Inaugural Address 1961, John Kennedy; “A Time for Choosing,” 1964 speech, Ronald Reagan.
  • GC.46 Describe the Civil Rights Movement and analyze resulting legislation and legal precedents. (C, H, P)
  • GC.47 Describe the women’s rights movement and analyze resulting legislation and legal precedents. (C, H, P)
  • GC48 Identify legislation and legal precedents that established rights for the disabled, Hispanics, American Indians, Asians, and other minority groups, including the tensions between protected categories (e.g., race, women, veterans) and non-protected ones (United States v. Carolene Products, Adarand Constructors v. Pena). (C, H, P)
  • Primary Documents and Supporting Texts to Consider: excerpts from Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments and Resolution 1848; “I Have a Dream” speech, and Letter from a Birmingham Jail, Martin Luther King, Jr.

High School Standards: United States History

  • US.11 Using textual evidence, compare and contrast the ideas and philosophies of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Dubois. (C, P)
  • US.17 Analyze the goals and achievements of the Progressive movement, including the following: (C, E, H, P)
    • Adoption of the initiative, referendum, and recall
    • Adoption of the primary system
    • 16th Amendment
    • 17th Amendment
    • impact on the relationship between the citizen and the government
  • US.18 Describe the movement to achieve suffrage for women, including its leaders, the activities of suffragettes, the passage of the 19th Amendment, and the role of Tennessee in the suffrage effort (Anne Dallas Dudley, Harry Burn, Josephine Pearson, “Perfect 36”). (C, H, P, TN)
  • US.37 Explain the background of the Temperance Movement, the passage of the 18th Amendment to the Constitution and the Volstead Act; the impact of Prohibition on American society and its successes and failures, including the rise of organized crime, bootlegging and speakeasies, and repeal by the 21 st Amendment. (E, C, H, P)
  • US.50 Analyze the effects of and the controversies arising from New Deal economic policies, including charges of socialism and FDR’s “court packing” attempt. (E, P)
  • US.88 Describe President Kennedy’s New Frontier programs to improve education, end racial discrimination, create the Peace Corps, and propel the United States to superiority in the Space Race. (C, E, H, P)
  • US.89 Examine court cases in the evolution of civil rights, including Brown v. Board of Education and Regents of the University of California v. Bakke. (C, H, P)
  • US.90 Examine the roles of civil rights advocates, including the following: (C, H, P, TN)
    • Martin Luther King, Jr.
    • Malcolm X
    • Thurgood Marshall
    • Rosa Parks
    • Stokely Carmichael
    • President John Kennedy
    • Robert Kennedy
    • Presideny Lyndon Johnson
    • James Meredith
    • Jim Lawson
  • US.91 Examine the roles of civil rights opponents, including Strom Thurmond, George Wallace, Orval Faubus, Bull Connor, and the KKK. (C, H, P)
  • US.92 Describe significant events in the struggle to secure civil rights for African Americans, including the following: (C, H, P, TN)
    • Columbia Race Riots
    • Tent Cities of Haywood and Fayette Counties
    • Influence of the Highlander Folk School and civil rights advocacy groups, including the SCLC, SNCC, and CORE
    • Integration of Central High School in Little Rock and Clinton High School in Clinton, Tennessee
    • Montgomery Bus Boycott
    • Birmingham bombings 1963
    • Freedom Rides, including the opposition of Bull Connor and George Wallace
    • March on Washington
    • Sit-ins, marches, demonstrations, boycotts, Nashville Sit-ins, Diane Nash
    • Assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • US.93 Cite textual evidence, determine the central meaning, and evaluate the explanations offered for various events by examining excerpts from the following texts: Martin Luther King, Jr. (“Letter from a Birmingham Jail” and “I Have a Dream” speech) and Malcolm X (“The Ballot or the Bullet”). (C, P)
  • US.94 Analyze the civil rights and voting rights legislation, including the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the Civil Rights Act of 1968, and the 24th Amendment. (C, E, H, P)
  • US.95 Describe the Chicano Movement, the American Indian Movement, and Feminist Movement and their purposes and goals. (C, E, P)
  • US.99 Analyze the Watergate scandal, including the background of the break-in, the importance of the court case United States v. Nixon, the changing role of media and journalism, the controversy surrounding Ford’s pardon of Nixon, and the legacy of distrust left in its wake. (H, P)
  • US.110 Explain the reasons for and the outcome of the Supreme Court case Bush v. Gore. (H, P)
  • US.112 Describe the increasing role of women and minorities in American society, politics, and economy, including the achievements of Sandra Day O’Connor, Sally Ride, Geraldine Ferraro, Hillary Clinton, Condoleezza Rice, Nancy Pelosi, and the election of President Barack Obama. (C, H, P)