Utah

Utah Administrative Code, the Elementary and Secondary School Core Curriculum:

R277-700-4. Elementary Education Requirements: Social studies is listed as a core subject area requirement for grades 3-6.

R277-700-5. Middle School Education Requirements: 1.5 units of credit for social studies are required of grades 7-8.

R277-700-6. High School Requirements: 3 units of credit for social studies are required of grades 9-12, including: Geography for Life (0.5 units of credit), World Civilizations (0.5 units of credit), U.S. History (1 unit of credit), U.S. Government and Citizenship (0.5 units of credit) and General Financial Literacy (0.5 units of credit).

 

Utah Core Standards for Social Studies

Grade K

  • Standard 2 (Citizenship) Students will recognize their roles and responsibilities of being a good citizen.
    • Objective 1 Demonstrate appropriate ways to behave in different settings.
      • Explain why families and classrooms have rules (e.g., examples of rules and consequences).
      • Identify examples of honesty, responsibility, patriotism, and courage from history, literature, and folklore, as well as from everyday life (e.g., heroes of diverse cultures).
    • Objective 3 Investigate and explain how symbols and songs unite families and classmates.
      • Recognize state and national symbols (e.g., state and national flags, bald eagle, seagull, Statue of Liberty).
      • Learn and sing state and U.S. patriotic songs.
      • Identify the people and events honored in Utah and U.S. commemorative holidays.
      • Know the words and meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance.
      • Identify the rules and etiquette of citizenship (e.g., stand for the flag, hand over heart).

Grade 1

  • Standard 2 (Citizenship) Students will recognize their roles and responsibilities in the school and in the neighborhood.
    • Objective 3 Name school, neighborhood, Utah state, and national symbols, landmarks, and documents.
      • Identify national symbols, documents, and landmarks (e.g., Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution, Liberty Bell, Washington Monument).
  • Demonstrate respect for patriotic practices and customs (e.g., Pledge of Allegiance and flag etiquette).

Grade 2

  • Standard 2 (Citizenship) Students will recognize and practice civic responsibility in the community, state, and nation.
    • Objective 1 Examine civic responsibility and demonstrate good citizenship.
      • Describe characteristics of being a good citizen through the examples of historic figures and ordinary citizens.
      • Explain the benefits of being a U.S. citizen (e.g., responsibilities, freedoms, opportunities, and the importance of voting in free elections).
      • Identify state and national activities (e.g., voting, Pledge of Allegiance, holidays).
    • Objective 3 Investigate and show how communities, state, and nation are united by symbols that represent citizenship in our nation.
      • Explain the significance of various community, state, and national celebrations (e.g., Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Thanksgiving).
      • Identify and explain the significance of various national symbols, documents, and landmarks (e.g., Declaration of Independence, Constitution, flag, Pledge of Allegiance, national monuments, national capitol building).

Grade 3

  • Standard III Students will understand the principles of civic responsibility in classroom, community, and country.
    • Objective 1 Describe the rights and responsibilities inherent in being a contributing member of a community.
      • Identify how these rights and responsibilities are reflected in the patriotic symbols and traditions of the United States (i.e., Pledge of Allegiance, flag etiquette).
    • Objective 2 Identify ways community needs are met by government.
      • Identify roles of representative government (e.g., make laws, maintain order, levy taxes, provide public services).
      • Research community needs and the role government serves in meeting those needs.

Grade 4

  • Standard III Students will understand the roles of civic life, politics, and government in the lives of Utah citizens.
    • Objective 1 Describe the responsibilities and rights of individuals in a representative government as well as in the school and community.
      • Identify rights of a citizen (e.g., voting, peaceful assembly, freedom of religion).
      • Identify responsibilities of a citizen (e.g., jury duty, obeying the law, paying taxes).
      • Determine how and why the rights and responsibilities of various groups have varied over time (e.g., Chinese railroad workers, Greek miners, women, children, Mormons, Japanese- Americans at Topaz, Americans Indians, and African Americans).
      • Recognize and demonstrate respect for United States and Utah symbols (i.e., Pledge of Allegiance, flag etiquette).

Grade 5

  • Standard I Students will understand how the exploration and colonization of North America transformed human history.
    • Objective 1 Describe and explain the growth and development of the early American colonies.
      • Determine reasons for the exploration of North America (e.g., religious, economic, political).
      • Compare the geographic and cultural differences between New England, Middle, and Southern colonies (e.g., religious, economic, political).
    • Objective 3 Distinguish between the rights and responsibilities held by different groups of people during the colonial period.
      • Compare the varying degrees of freedom held by different groups (e.g., American Indians, landowners, women, indentured servants, and enslaved people).
      • Explain how early leaders established the first colonial governments (e.g., Mayflower compact, charters).
      • Describe the basic principles and purposes of the Iroquois Confederacy.
  • Standard II Students will understand the chronology and significance of key events leading to self- government.
    • Objective 1 Describe how the movement toward revolution culminated in a Declaration of Independence.
      • Explain the role of events that led to declaring independence (e.g., French and Indian War, Stamp Act, Boston Tea Party).
      • Analyze arguments both for and against declaring independence using primary sources from Loyalist and patriot perspectives.
      • Explain the content and purpose for the Declaration of Independence.
    • Objective 2 Evaluate the Revolutionary War’s impact on self-rule.
      • Plot a time line of the key events of the Revolutionary War.
      • Profile citizens who rose to greatness as leaders.
      • Assess how the Revolutionary War changed the way people thought about their own rights.
      • Explain how the winning of the war set in motion a need for a new government that would serve the needs of the new states.
  • Standard III Students will understand the rights and responsibilities guaranteed in the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights.
    • Objective 1 Assess the underlying principles of the U.S. Constitution as the framework for the United States’ form of government, a compound constitutional republic.
      • Recognize ideas from documents used to develop the Constitution (e.g., Magna Carta, Iroquois Confederacy, Articles of Confederation, and Virginia Plan).
      • Analyze goals outlined in the Preamble.
      • Distinguish between the role of the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branches of the government.
      • Explain the process of passing a law.
      • Describe the concept of checks and balances.
      • Discover the basis for the patriotic and citizenship traditions we have today (i.e., Pledge of Allegiance, flag etiquette, voting).
    • Objective 2 Assess how the U.S. Constitution has been amended and interpreted over time, and the impact these amendments have had on the rights and responsibilities of citizens of the United States.
      • Explain the significance of the Bill of Rights.
      • Identify how the rights of selected groups have changed and how the Constitution reflects those changes (e.g., women, enslaved people).
      • Analyze the impact of the Constitution on their lives today (e.g., freedom of religion, speech, press, assembly, and petition).
  • Standard IV Students will understand that the 19th century was a time of incredible change for the United States, including geographic expansion, constitutional crisis, and economic growth.
    • Objective 2 Assess the geographic, cultural, political, and economic divisions between regions that contributed to the Civil War.
      • Compare how cultural economic differences of the North and South led to tensions.
      • Identify the range of individual responses to the growing political conflicts between the North and South (e.g., states’ rights advocates, abolitionists, slaveholders, and enslaved people).
    • Objective 3 Evaluate the course of events of the Civil War and its impact both immediate and long-term.
      • Identify the key ideas, events, and leaders of the Civil War using primary sources (e.g., Gettysburg Address, Emancipation Proclamation, news accounts, photographic records, and diaries).
      • Explain how the Civil War helped forge ideas of national identity.
      • Examine the difficulties of reconciliation within the nation.
  • Standard V Students will address the causes, consequences and implications of the emergence of the United States as a world power.
    • Objective 2 Assess the impact of social and political movements in recent United States history.
      • Identify major social movements of the 20th century (e.g., the women’s movement, the civil rights movement, child labor reforms).
      • Identify leaders of social and political movements.
    • Objective 3 Evaluate the role of the United States as a world power.
      • Assess differing points of view on the role of the U.S. as a world power (e.g., influencing the spread of democracy, supporting the rule of law, advocating human rights, promoting environmental stewardship).
  • Identify a current issue facing the world and propose a role the United States could play in being part of a solution (e.g., genocide, child labor, civil rights, education, public health, environmental protections, suffrage, and economic disparities.

Grade 6

  • Standard II Students will understand the transformation of cultures during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance and the impact of this transformation on modern times.
    • Objective 3 Examine how systems of governance began steps toward self-rule during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.
      • Examine relationships between significant events and ideas and their influence on systems of government (e.g., the rise of the merchant class, the Magna Carta, the impact of the Black Death, Germanic tribes, feudalism, manors, city-states).
      • Compare individual rights of people in the United States today with the rights of selected groups in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance (e.g., serfs, nobility, merchant class).
  • Standard III Students will understand how revolutions have had an impact on the modern world.
    • Objective 1 Understand processes of revolution.
      • Examine social, religious, and economic issues that may lead to revolution.
      • Objective 2 Analyze the impact of selected revolutions.
      • Identify representative people from selected revolutions (e.g., Napoleon, Martin Luther, James Watt, Isaac Newton, Madame Curie, Anton Van Leeuwenhoek).
      • Examine the outcomes of selected revolutions (e.g., the Scientific and Industrial revolutions; the Reformation; and the French Revolution).

Grades 7-12: United States History I

  • Standard 3 Students will understand the changes caused by European exploration in the Americas.
    • Objective 2 Analyze the reasons for European exploration.
      • Examine the political reasons behind exploration; e.g., empire building, European rivalries.
      • Investigate the social reasons behind exploration; e.g., spreading ideas and beliefs, seeking religious freedoms.
      • Identify key individuals who contributed to European exploration; e.g., Columbus, Cartier, Cabot, Hudson.
    • Objective 3 Assess the impact of European exploration on African slaves and American Indian nations.
      • Examine the reasons for slavery in the New World; e.g., cotton, sugar, tobacco.
      • Trace the beginnings of the slave trade in the Americas.
  • Standard 4 Students will analyze European colonization and settlement of North America.
    • Objective 1 Explain where and why European countries colonized North America; e.g., the Netherlands, England, France, Spain.
      • Identify motives for exploration; e.g., religion, expansion, trade, wealth.
      • Investigate the contributions and influences of the major European powers.
    • Objective 2 Assess the reasons for settlement of the English colonies.
      • Compare the reasons for settlement in the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies.
      • Explain the contributions of key individuals in the settling of the English colonies; e.g., John Smith, Lord Baltimore, William Bradford.
      • Identify key groups involved in the settlement of the English colonies; e.g., Virginia Company, Pilgrims, Puritans, Quakers.
      • Determine the reasons for conflict between the European powers in North America.
      • Examine the causes and outcomes of the French and Indian War.
    • Objective 3 Examine the economic, political, and social patterns in the development of the 13 English colonies.
      • Explain the development of self-government in the colonies.
      • Investigate the lifestyles and cultures of the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies; e.g., education, slavery, religion.
  • Standard 5 Students will understand the significance of the American Revolution in the development of the United States.
    • Objective 1 Analyze what ideas and events led to the Revolutionary movement.
      • Explore the events leading to the outbreak of armed conflict between the American colonies and Great Britain.
      • Analyze the origin of the ideas behind the Revolutionary movement and the movement toward independence; e.g., social contract, natural rights, English traditions.
      • Explain the major ideas expressed in the Declaration of Independence.
    • Objective 3 Evaluate the contributions of key people and groups to the Revolution.
      • Identify the contributions of colonial leaders; e.g., George Washington, Thomas Paine, Alexander Hamilton, Sam Adams, John Adams.
      • Analyze the role various political groups played in the Revolutionary movement; e.g., Sons and Daughters of Liberty, Committees of Correspondence, 1st and 2nd Continental Congress.
      • Examine the contributions of various social groups to the Revolutionary movement; e.g., women, free and enslaved blacks, American Indians.
    • Objective 4 Examine the effects of the Revolution on the United States.
      • Determine the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation.
      • Investigate the problems that faced the emerging nation; e.g., debt, lack of unified central government, international relations.
      • Explain the effect the Revolution had on people; e.g., Native American Indians, enslaved people, European immigrants.
  • Standard 6 Students will understand the structure and function of the United States government established by the Constitution.
    • Objective 1 Assess the foundations and principles that led to the development of the Constitution, and to the United States’ form of government, a compound constitutional republic.
      • Analyze the factors involved in convening the Constitutional Convention.
      • Investigate the ideas and documents that became the foundation for the United States Constitution; e.g., Magna Carta, Iroquois Confederation, European philosophers.
      • Analyze the compromises that led to the ratification of the Constitution.
      • Compare the Federalist and Anti-Federalist ratification debates.
      • Examine the Constitution ratification compromises; e.g., 3/5 Compromise, Great Compromise, Bill of Rights.
    • Objective 3 Examine the basic structure of the Constitution.
      • Identify the major elements of the United States Constitution.
      • Explain the purpose of the Constitution as outlined in the preamble.
      • Explore the role and functions of the three branches of government.
      • Examine the Constitutional principles of separation of powers and checks and balances.
      • Determine the role of the Constitution as a living document.
    • Objective 4 Analyze the rights, liberties, and responsibilities of citizens.
      • Identify the responsibilities of citizenship to secure liberties; e.g., vote, perform jury duty, obey laws.
      • Examine the Bill of Rights and its specific guarantees.
  • Standard 8 Students will examine the expansion of the political system and social rights before the Civil War.
    • Objective 1 Investigate the development of the American political party system.
      • Examine the differences between the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans.
      • Trace the development of new political parties throughout the 18th and 19th centuries; e.g., Whigs, Jacksonian Democrats, Republicans.
      • Determine the role of third parties as an agent of reform.
      • Investigate the role of political parties in the electoral process.
    • Objective 2 Analyze the evolution of democracy and the extension of democratic principles.
      • Examine how the Supreme Court strengthened the national government.
      • Analyze how states’ rights issues led to growing sectionalism.
      • Investigate the relationship between national and state governments in expanding democracy.
      • Appraise how the political process changed to involve more people.
    • Objective 3 Analyze the impact of social reforms on Americans during the 19th century.
      • Examine the abolitionist movement; e.g., Sojourner Truth, William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglas, the Grimke sisters.
      • Investigate the impact of reform in education, religion, prisons, and the treatment of the mentally ill during the period.
      • Examine the extension of women’s political and legal rights.
  • Standard 9 Students will understand the significance of the Civil War Era to the United States.
    • Objective 1 Analyze differences and events that led to the Civil War.
      • Describe the cultural differences between the North and the South.
      • Analyze how states’ rights led to conflict between the North and the South.
      • Trace the failure of compromise to ease sectional differences; e.g., Missouri Compromise, Compromise 1850, Kansas-Nebraska Act.
      • Investigate how the abolitionist movement increased sectional tensions between the Northern and Southern states; e.g., John Brown’s raid, Dred Scott decision, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, the Fugitive Slave Law.
      • Assess how the election of 1860 led to secession.
    • Objective 2 Determine the factors that affected the course of the war and contributed to Union victory.
      • Analyze the impact of the Emancipation Proclamation on the United States and the Confederacy.
      • Identify the contributions of key individuals in the Civil War; e.g., Lincoln, Davis, Lee, Grant.
    • Objective 3 Evaluate the Reconstruction period and how it affected the United States following the Civil War.
      • Explain the purpose of Reconstruction.
      • Analyze the social impact of Reconstruction; e.g., abolition of slavery, integration of races, fall of Southern society, education.
      • Explain the political changes brought about by the Reconstruction Era; e.g., 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments, voting regulations, military districts.

Grades 7-12: World Civilizations

  • Standard 4 Students will understand the influence of revolution and social change in the transition from early modern to contemporary societies.
    • Objective 1 Assess the importance of intellectual and cultural change on early modern society.
      • Examine the key events and ideas of the Protestant Reformation, the Counter Reformation, and Neo-Confucianism.
      • Analyze the significant ideas and philosophies of the scientific revolution and the Enlightenment.
    • Objective 2 Investigate the role of revolution in the establishment of governmental systems.
      • Explain the political, economic, and social philosophies that lead to revolution.
      • Compare and contrast major world revolutions; e.g., American, French, Russian, Chinese.

Grades 7-12: US History II

  • Standard 1 Students will expand their knowledge of pre-Reconstruction America.
    • Objective 1 Examine the American colonial experience.
      • Identify reasons for the establishment of colonies in America.
      • Examine the rise of American culture in the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies.
    • Objective 2 Investigate the development of the United States’ form of government, a compound constitutional republic, and its institutions and politics.
      • Identify the philosophies which influenced the development of the Constitution, separation of powers, balance of power, and the elastic clause.
      • Analyze the Constitution’s creation and impact on the new United States.
      • Trace the development of American government and politics from the Federalist period through Jacksonian democracy.
    • Objective 3 Analyze the growth and division of the United States from 1820 through 1877.
      • Trace the United States’ expansion and growth from the Atlantic to the Pacific.
      • Recognize the sectional differences that developed during the antebellum period.
      • Evaluate the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War.
      • Analyze the successes and failures of the Reconstruction period following the Civil War.
      • Examine the United States’ policies relating to American Indians.
  • Standard 3 Students will recognize how social reform occurred at the turn of the century.
    • Objective 1 Investigate reform movements and their prominent leaders.
      • Investigate the emerging civil rights movements for women and African Americans.
  • Standard 4 Students will understand how war affected the early 20th century.
    • Objective 2 Examine how World War I affected the military and the home front of the United States.
      • Examine the impact World War I had on the United States; e.g., government policy, industrial might, civil liberties.
  • Standard 9 The students will understand the emergence and development of the human rights and culture in the modern era.
    • Objective 1 Analyze how the civil rights movement affected United States society.
      • Identify the causes and consequences of civil rights legislation and court decisions.
      • Investigate the fight for the political, economic, and social equality for women.
      • Analyze how the black civil rights movement utilized both social and political actions to achieve its goals.
      • Investigate the gains in civil rights made by the American Indian nations, Mexican Americans, and other ethnic groups in the last half of the twentieth century.

Grades 7-12: US Government and Citizenship

  • Standard 1 Students will understand the significance and impact of the Constitution on everyday life.
    • Objective 1 Investigate the ideas and events that significantly influenced the creation of the United States Constitution and the United States’ form of government, a compound constitutional republic.
      • Identify and summarize the philosophies that contributed to the Constitution; e.g., Machiavelli, Locke, Jefferson, Madison, Hamilton.
      • Identify and investigate the events that led to the creation of the Constitution.
      • Analyze how the idea of compromise affected the Constitution.
    • Objective 2 Assess the essential ideas of United States constitutional government.
      • Examine the purposes and role of government.
      • Investigate the major ideas of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and other writings; e.g., Magna Carta, English Bill of Rights, Mayflower Compact, Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, Iroquois Confederation.
      • Compare the Articles of Confederation to the United States Constitution.
    • Objective 3 Determine the importance of popular sovereignty and limited government in a democratic society.
      • Explain how the separation of powers is maintained through checks and balances.
      • Describe how the federal system of government creates a division of power.
      • Determine how judicial review makes the Constitution a living document.
      • Examine how the rule of law affects everyday life.
      • Investigate the necessity for civic virtue.
    • Objective 4 Investigate the organization and functions of the United States government.
      • Explain how legislative, executive, and judicial powers are distributed and shared among the three branches of national government.
      • Describe how the United States Congress makes laws.
      • Examine the ways in which the executive branch carries out laws.
      • Investigate how laws are interpreted by courts through an adversarial process; i.e., plaintiff, defendant.
  • Standard 2 Students will understand the protections and privileges of individuals and groups in the United States.
    • Objective 1 Assess the freedoms and rights guaranteed in the United States Constitution.
      • Determine the rights and liberties outlined in the Bill of Rights.
      • Examine how the Bill of Rights promotes civil rights and protects diversity.
      • Assess the significance of the First and Fourteenth Amendments.
    • Objective 2 Analyze how civil rights and liberties have been changed through court decisions.
      • Examine how the Bill of Rights promotes a just legal system.
      • Summarize the differing interpretations of the strict versus loose constructionists.
      • Identify landmark cases and their impact on civil rights and individual liberties; e.g., Dred Scott, Plessey, Brown, Miranda, Gideon, Bakke.
  • Standard 3 Students will understand the distribution of power among the national, state, and local governments in the United States federal system, or compound constitutional republic.
    • Objective 1 Determine the relationship between the national government and the states.
      • Identify and explain the concept of federalism.
      • Examine the debate between federal supremacy and states’ rights.
      • Assess the unique relationship between the sovereign American Indian nations and the United States government.
    • Objective 2 Analyze the role of local government in the United States federal system.
      • Describe the powers given to local governments.
      • Investigate the structure and function of local government.
      • Assess how federal monies influence local policy and decision-making.
      • Explore current issues affecting local governments; e.g., spending, state v. local control, land use.
      • Examine how public education is a function of state and local government.
  • Standard 4 Students will understand the responsibilities of citizens in the United States.
    • Objective 1 Investigate the responsibilities and obligations of a citizen.
      • Assess the need to obey laws.
      • Examine the election and voting process.
      • Examine the United States tax system.
      • Recognize the need for selective service in maintaining a military.
      • Investigate the major political parties and their ideas.
    • Objective 2 Investigate ways in which responsible citizens take part in civic life.
      • Evaluate the need for civic dialogue in maintaining a democratic society; e.g., public meetings, mass meetings.
      • Participate in activities that promote the public good; e.g., the voting process, jury duty, community service.
    • Objective 3 Assess methods for respectfully dealing with differences.
      • Analyze and evaluate conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to conflict and cooperation.
      • Develop an understanding of the role of civility in dealing with individual and group differences.